New Luxury Car

Reaching Hispanic Car Buyers

While the numbers may vary (one projection is that the Hispanic market will represent $1.7 Trillion buying power by 2020), the consensus is that the Hispanic market is massive, and therefore the influence of Hispanic car buyers is a major opportunity for any business.  In this case, let’s look at auto dealers.

Car dealership owners in the U.S. are focused on selling as many cars as possible and as their local or regional market changes they are one of the fastest groups to react to these changes.   While there are major advertising dollars focusing on Hispanic markets from some automakers, the local focus of the dealers means that regardless of the national focus, they may create their local sites, offers and advertising to grab the attention of their market.

Below is an example of from Arlington Toyota of a vehicle walk through in Spanish for their market.

Each market is different, even when looking at the Hispanic market.  The local market in Miami is quite different than the markets in San Francisco, New York or any other.  There are numerous factors including language (Spanish versus English), to cultural backgrounds and differences in country of origin or individuals or family (U.S. born, 3rd generation is different from 1st generation family recently arriving from Guatemala) can be significantly different.  In some markets, the big sellers may be the less expensive vehicles, while in many cases the Hispanic market is purchasing high end luxury cars. (Example from Lexus below) These are the details that local/regional dealerships understand.

Above is an example from JM Lexus showing the key attributes in Spanish of choosing a Lexus.

More than ever there are cost effective options for dealers.  From managing their own sites and social media presence, to working with local publications, to working with multicultural digital specialists to reach Hispanic car buyers. To continue to learn more about reaching these audiences, here are some additional resources:


latino food

IRI Examines New Product Purchasing Habits of U.S. Hispanic Shoppers

The Hispanic community is the fastest-growing ethnic group in the nation and spends more than $94.7 billion on CPG products annually. Because Hispanics are one of the most sought-after ethnic groups in the retail grocery market, IRI is diving deeper into last year’s most successful CPG launches to better understand Hispanics and New Product Pacesetters. CPG marketers have a great opportunity to capture more shopping dollars from Hispanic consumers, especially if they understand some key nuances in their attitudes and preferences regarding new products, compared to those of the general consumer population.

“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly”

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“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly,” said Susan Viamari, vice president of Thought Leadership for IRI. “Unfortunately, most marketers don’t have easy access to detailed information on what Hispanic shoppers are buying, including in key CPG categories. This significantly limits new growth opportunities for brands, so we examined what Hispanics are buying, and even why they are buying products, to help marketers engage with these very important consumers.”

While Hispanic buying power is concentrated in select markets, including New Mexico, Texas, California, Florida, Nevada, Colorado, New Jersey, New York and Illinois, their interest in new products is spread across retail departments. Among those consumers who consider themselves avid new product adopters, there is a particular interest in the following departments (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Food:

26%, 29%, 25%, 23%

Beverage:

19%, 20%, 13%, 16%

Beauty/Personal Care:

19%, 24%, 29%, 12%

Home Care:

13%, 20%, 29%, 11%

Health Care:

10%, 13%, 20%, 9%

Pet Care:

9%, 8%, 9%, 6%

Top-Selling Food and Beverage Launches

Based on the most successful CPG launches in the 2017 New Product Pacesetters report, IRI uncovered the top-selling food and beverage products for Hispanic consumers:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Food and Beverage Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Halo Top® 93
2. Hillshire® Snacking 117
3. Chobani® Drinks 102
4. GOOD THiNS® 111
5. Oscar Mayer® Natural 116
6. Dunkin’ Donuts® Iced Coffee 72
7. Cracker Barrel® Macaroni & Cheese 143
8. Birds Eye® Steamfresh® Veggie Made 97
9. SMARTMADE by Smart Ones® 119
10. POWERADE® X ION4® 83

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage/Hispanic Specialty Panel

The mix of healthy and indulgent products found in the top-10 ranking truly reflects Hispanics’ attitudes toward eating. For instance, 36 percent of Hispanics say they eat healthy half of the time and eat whatever they want the other half. An additional 36 percent of Hispanic consumers say they eat healthy 80 percent of the time and allow for indulgences 20 percent of the time. So, moderation is the key for most Hispanics.

The top healthy eating considerations vary significantly across Hispanic sectors (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Avoiding processed foods:

58%, 54%, 31%, 56%

The right mix of different types of food:

44%, 36%, 36%, 42%

Natural foods:

30%, 41%, 24%, 23%

Organic foods:

20%, 19%, 40%, 15%

Include higher-calorie treats in moderation:

10%, 6%, 21%, 11%

Top-Selling Non-Food Launches

Forty percent of Pacesetter brands that hit the mark with Hispanics tout “more natural,” “organic,” “herbal,” or “holistic” attributes, which also helped shape the top-10 non-food ranking:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Non-Food Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Fancy Feast® Medleys® 149
2. Garnier® Whole Blends 104
3. Carol’s Daughter® 164
4. Herbal Essences® Bio:Renew 100
5. Copper Chef® 95
6. GLISS® Hair Repair® 96
7. Dove® Nutritive Solutions 116
8. Dentalife® 87
9. Red Copper® 105
10. OxiClean HD 140

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage™/Hispanic Specialty Panel

Hispanics are looking for new non-food products that provide new health benefits and faster results. Key considerations for new products include (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Offers longer-lasting relief compared to existing alternatives:

31%, 28%, 32%, 32%

Offers faster relief than existing products:

30%, 25%, 14%, 30%

Treats multiple symptoms:

32%, 33%, 29%, 27%

Appeals to many people in my household:

27%, 28%, 25%, 21%

Offers new health benefits:

26%, 28%, 35%, 21%

“Hispanics are a highly diverse group, based on factors such as age, income, media preferences and language preference — English-preferred, bilingual or Spanish-preferred,” said Staci Covkin, principal of Consumer and Shopper Marketing for IRI. “Attracting Hispanics requires an understanding of these language preferences, along with their digital and social preferences, to quickly see a huge opportunity for CPG across food, beauty, home and health care brands. Aligning a new product launch with the needs of Hispanic shoppers is rapidly becoming a critical success factor for sustained CPG and retail growth, so improved insights and activation of these shoppers can result in significant sales and market share uplift.”

For the complete analysis on Hispanics and New Product Trends, click here. For more information, contact IRI at customerinteractioncenter@IRIworldwide.com

 

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180606005323/en/IRI-Examines-New-Product-Purchasing-Habits-U.S.


Hispanic marketing - still relevant?

Is Hispanic marketing still relevant?  In all but the most remote places, latino influence in the United States is hard to miss, so of course it is.

Multicultural audiences continue to grow in size and importance and the Hispanic audience is one of the most important.  The U.S. Hispanic market has massive influence on the success businesses as well as on American culture.  Almost, if not all major cities in the U.S. have integrated latino food, music, culture, and even street signs into their metro area.    What is always being debated is how to reach this segment.  From a recent media post article there were some key points that highlighted some interesting items.

Language:  While to percentage of Hispanics that are proficient in English has risen swiftly, the percentage of Hispanics that stream entertainment in Spanish has also increased significantly (even greater among Hispanic millennials).  

Boy with Sombrero lazy Hispanic marketing.
Some hispanic marketing attempts are less than ideal.

Influence:  While the population growth is still strong, it has slowed somewhat, yet the integration of the segment into American culture is stronger than ever.  In business ownership the Hispanic community now comprises ownership of 12% of all U.S. business.

Many marketers take the approach of adding a stock photo of a latino looking person to an ad, check a box on whatever programmatic platform and call it a day.  While there are some that fully integrate a “total market” strategy” incorporating cultural relevance, language, etc with an overall cohesive strategy,  but that seems to fall more to Toyota, P&G, Coca Cola and other major advertisers.  

The U.S. Hispanic segment is one of the most important segments and represents major buying power and influence.  It is time for marketers to pay more than lip service to the importance of the group.  There are numerous factors in these decisions such as time, budget, and need.  However there are numerous options to reach this segment through focused media, and utilizing agencies that specialize in multicultural segments that are more effective and don’t necessarily require utilizing an entire advertising budget.

 

 

 


2018 Diversity Calendar of Events

The United States is rich with diversity and if there was any question, just have a look at the diversity of our celebrations. From Martin Luther King day in January, Black History month in February, Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage month (May) to Hispanic Heritage month (September/October) to name just a few.

Have a look at the full break down from Diversity Best Practices and I’m sure you will find some that you weren’t even aware of (ex. Krishna Janmashtami…..will let you find that one in the list).

Here are some key ones that should be on the minds of  multicultural marketers.

January

January 15: Martin Luther King Day commemorates the birth of Martin Luther King, Jr., the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize and an activist for non-violent social change until his assassination in 1968.

February
February is Black History Month in the United States and Canada.

February 9-25 Olympics PyeongChang:  OK, not an officially on diversity calendars, but is a celebration of diversity in athletics, athletes and cultures.

February 16: Lunar New Year, one of the most sacred of all traditional Chinese holidays, a time of family reunion and celebration. Lunar New Year is also celebrated at this time in Japan, Korea, Vietnam and Mongolia.

March
March is Women’s History Month.

May
May is Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in the United States.

June
June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month.

2018 World Cup June 14-July 15, 2018

July
2018 FIFA World Cup

September
From September 15th to October 15th is Hispanic Heritage Month. This month corresponds with Mexican Independence Day, which is celebrated on September 16, and recognizes the revolution in 1810 that ended Spanish dictatorship.

October
October 8: Indigenous Peoples / Columbus day.  Many cities in the U.S. have been stepping away from “Columbus day” in favor of “Indigenous People’s day.”  See some background here

November / December

Including the likes of Thanksgiving, Black Friday, Cyber Monday, Christmas and New Years this period is key for marketers.  After all it seems that Toyotathon is almost a national holiday.

 

 

 


USA multicultural delegation for the Olympics in PyeongChang

The 2018 Olympic games in PyeongChang South Korea are an exhibition of diversity in sport.  Every four years the United States has an opportunity to show the world just how diverse we are.  While the likes of Chloe Kim (U.S. born Korean American gold medalist snowboarder) are making headlines, the 2018 U.S. Olympic team is one of the largest and most diverse ever.

Quick statistics on U.S. Olympic team diversity for the 2018 Olympic games in PyeongChang South Korea.

  • 242 athletes
  • 108 female (45%)
  • 10 African-Americans
  • 11 Asian-Americans
  • 3 Latinos (plus 1 for Puerto Rico and even a Mexico athlete who grew up in the U.S.)
  • 2 openly gay athletes
  • age range 17-39

In a challenging global environment where seemingly diversity is not always welcomed, this is an area where the United States does lead and hopefully will continue.  Regardless of the medal count the stories of the Olympic games and the challenges of the athletes are always a great story.

 

 


How universities are recruiting new students with Immersive Marketing

If you manage an University that offers outstanding facilities, world class teaching, or a vibrant community, showcase your establishment and capture the essence of what it is like to visit in person, well, immersive technologies will fit in this challenge.

One of the main benefits of providing virtual tours is that it provides an accessible way for foreign students to view your university and its facilities from abroad. Due to financial and time constraints it is often not possible for international students to visit a campus in person from abroad before making their selection decision, in fact the majority choose a university without ever having visited in person.

By providing the opportunity for them to experience everything your university has to offer virtually you will stand out from competing institutions who provide far less immersive and engaging digital content on what university life will involve.

Furthermore, it also offers these students the opportunity to share the university tour experience with key influencers of their selection process such as parents, family and friends, all whom may play an important role in their ultimate decision.

 

How 360-degree video ad looks like:

This is real example posted by the Seattle Pacific University’s channel on YouTube.

 

Nice, isn’t it?

Well, it’s cool but it’s could be better. Evaluate the following reasons:

  1. Embed a video from Youtube in a website (let’s said a blog about students) only will increase the traffic of your YouTube Channel. Why? Because every time when a user click on the video, they will go directly to your Youtube channel. However, you need these users go to your website, where you can attract them to apply to your programs.
  2. YouTube will only give you the information about how many times the video was played. Nothing else. This is not enough because the most useful KPI that you need to measure the sucess of a campaign, it is the number of clicks that the users did. An less, the only concern that you have is the awareness of your brand.
  3. If somebody embed your video, well, it’s hard to know where this video is hosted. From the brand safety perspective, this is really important. What happen if your video is running in an inappropriate website?
  4. If you set a campaign on Youtube, you only will be capable to show “banners” over any of the millions of videos watched by the users. Of course, it’s possible to define a targeting criteria, however, this conditions are not that good on this platform and eventually, you can see your banner over a video about puppies, ghosts, car accidents, jokes, among many other type of content that it could affects negatively your brand.
  5. Certainly it is possible to set a campaign of video pre-roll in Youtube. BUT, this platform has not developed yet the ability to show 360-degree videos as a pre-rolls ads.
  6. All the previous comments applies for Facebook too.

 

What is a suitable solution?

Run your 360-degree video ads in a network specialized on immersive marketing. Why?

  1. If you really worried about brand safety, you should choose a closed video network. That’s means that the network runs the ads on a certain number of websites where it’s possible to control and supervise the quality of the content.
  2. Additionally, you should choose a network capable to show your banners over your 360-degree videos. This is probably the most important key, because users can “click” on a banner and you will know exactly how many of them are reaching your website. We are talking about to measure “effectiveness” and why is this important? Because at the end of the day, this is the only way to know the campaign’s ROI.
  3. Ask about “exclusiveness”. This will guarantee that your ads will only appears in your own branded content videos, not in other videos made for automotive, travel, etc. Your branded video, your banner.

The following video is a PROTOTYPE showing how an immersive marketing campaign really works.


 

Interested? Write: sales@alcancemg.com


SafeLink program: FREE minutes, text & data

Recently Alcance Media has started to work with a U.S. Government program that assists eligible families with phone, text, and data and helps families in need stay connected.  SafeLink’s Free Wireless Program provided by Tracphone Wireless in conjunction with the Lifeline government benefit program allows qualified users with an applicable mobile device to access these benefits. Through an easy online application (can be downloaded as well) you can find out quickly if you qualify for benefits.

Cell phone service: Now Free!

Online application is through the website for SafeLink’s Free Wireless Program


Portada Miami | April 18-19 2018

The tenth annual edition of Portada Miami to discuss how brands across the Americas are taking back control, from rethinking internal structures to figuring out ROI on their media ad spend, to understanding how to work with new platforms and technologies.

Portada Miami will take place in the brand new East Miami Hotel, nestled in the heart of Brickell City Centre!
Portada is introducing 1:1 meetings with senior brand and agency executives (a service available under the Premium Level Pass type).

Members of Portada’’s powerful Council System that are available for meetings include senior executives representing Abbott Laboratories, Allstate, Anheuser-Busch, Comcast, Crown Imports, Horizon Media, GroupM,  Hilton, Hyatt,  IMG, JC Penney, LatAm Airlines, L’Oreal, Horizon, MasterCard, MediaCom and Visa. More to be announced.

See other events in Miami.

#PortadaLat17


10 Best Practices for Marketing to Hispanic Consumers

When you’re working with companies internationally, there’s an expectation that you will make an effort to understand the language and cultural differences among various countries and cultures. But within the U.S., linguistic and cultural differences are often overlooked—most notably, the fast-growing U.S. Spanish-speaking market. The U.S. is now the second largest Spanish-speaking country, behind Mexico.

View related webinar on multicultural customer experience: How to Market to Hispanic Consumers

2014 Pew Research Center report states that there are 55.4 million Spanish-speakers or Hispanics in the U.S., which is approximately 17.4% of the total U.S. population. And, Hispanic consumers represent $1.5 trillion in purchasing power. That’s a high market share to target, so it makes sense that an increasing number of companies are marketing to Hispanic consumers.

To capture this growing target audience, just translate your marketing content into Spanish, and you’re all set, right?

Not exactly.

Just like English in the U.S. vs. English in the U.K., not all Spanish is the same. With Spanish, from the many countries in Latin America to Spain, there are even more dialects. It’s not just about different pronunciations. Understand that many words have various meanings, depending on the dialect. This is true for many languages, including English, where elevatorin the U.S. is known as lift in the U.K.

Here are some best practices you should keep in mind and research further before you are developing a strategy for marketing to hispanics.

1. Understand the difference between Hispanic and Latino

There are many interpretations of how to define Hispanic vs Latino. For the purposes of this blog, I’ll distinguish the two in the following way: Hispanic refers to language and Latino (including Latina and Latino) refer to location Therefore, Hispanic here is defined as one who has a Spanish-speaking origin or ancestry, including Spain.

Latino refers to Spanish-speakers as well, but only people from Latin America—including Brazil. (Portuguese is spoken in Brazil, and thus, is not considered to be Hispanic.) Hispanic and Latino are often used interchangeably, even though they don’t mean the same thing. It’s important to be aware of not only who you are targeting, but also how you choose to reference them. Not all Spanish-speaking people are Latino, and not all Latinos are Hispanic.

2. Be aware of regional differences

According to the Pew Research Center, most U.S. Hispanics prefer to use their country of origin to describe themselves. More than half of the survey respondents said they have no preference for either term, Hispanic or Latino. However, it’s still important to localize your marketing efforts, as these preferences vary from state to state, and they also change as the Hispanic population grows.

For example, California has the highest Hispanic population percentage, and 30% of them say they prefer to be referenced as Hispanic, while 17% say they prefer Latino. But this preference is much stronger in Texas, where 46% of Hispanics said they prefer to be referenced as Hispanic, vs. 8% who prefer Latino.

Localization is critical in states with a high population of Hispanics, such as Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, New York, and Florida. There are several dialects of Spanish and Spanish variants in the U.S. Thus, Google Translate can’t compare to professional translation services—it lacks the ability to tailor translations to these dialects.

3. Consider generational and cultural gaps while tailoring marketing tactics and content

Hispanics, like many cultures, integrate their traditions from their countries of origin into their lives in the U.S. But cultural integration can vary depending on segments of the larger Hispanic consumer population. Generationally, they can be broken down into two main groups:

  • Traditionalists: Older immigrants, and some younger, are considered “traditionalists” who don’t speak fluent English. You can market to these traditionalists via Spanish-speaking TV and radio stations, as well as Spanish websites. Your marketing strategy should emphasize these traditional Hispanic cultural values and traditions including food, family, and holidays. Know the various dialects and idioms within a specific region, and don’t stop at the online home page, TV ad, or radio message. Keep the customer engaged.
  • Millennials: Second-generation Hispanics are those who are born in the U.S. into a Hispanic family. Like many second-generation ethnicities, they are typically the younger family members, including millennials, who have adopted many U.S. customs (and English) but still appreciate, respect, and enjoy their culture, language, and heritage.

10-best-practices-image

Note: White, Asian, and Black include only those who are single race and not Hispanic. Hispanics are of any race. Figures may not add to 100% due to rounding. Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2014 American Community Survey (IPUMS), “The Nation’s Latino Population is Defined by its Youth.”

 

Culturally, marketers tend to divide Hispanic online consumers into three different categories: Hispanic Dominant, Bicultural, and U.S. Dominant.

  • Hispanic Dominant (23%): This group speaks predominantly Spanish at home and consumes most media in Spanish. Typically, they’re foreign born and have a mean age of 40. On average, they’ve lived in the U.S. for seven years.
  • Bicultural (31%): This crowd typically speaks both English and Spanish at home, but they consume most media in English. They’re a combination of foreign and U.S. born and have a mean age of 34. They’ve lived in the U.S., on average, for 22 years.
  • U.S. Dominant (46%): This bunch generally speaks English at home and consumes most media in English. They’re U.S. born and with a mean age of 37, they’ve lived in the U.S. an average of 36 years.

Offline, the sizing of these groups is reversed, with Hispanic Dominant representing 52% of the segment, Bicultural 19%, and U.S. Dominant 28%.

4. Consider using “Spanglish”

For a U.S. Dominant or Bicultural audience, blend both Spanish and English into your campaign, keeping English as the primary language but integrating Spanish phrases, quotes, terms, etc. to truly connect to Hispanic consumers.

5. Include Hispanic talents, using Spanish influenced music and imagery

Create campaigns that are centered on Hispanic imagery and tell vibrant, colorful stories. But avoid stereotypes or singling Hispanics out.

6. Create mobile-friendly campaigns

Pew Hispanic Center found that Hispanic mobile phone owners are more likely than Anglo mobile phone owners to access the internet—40% vs. 34%. And according to a July 2014 Google Consumer Survey, Hispanics are 1.5 times more likely to buy mobile apps and digital media than non-Hispanics. Don’t miss these opportunities to connect with Hispanic consumers. Be sure to optimize all your digital touch points and campaigns for mobile.

7. Include Hispanic culture in online ads

88% of digital-using Hispanics pay attention to online ads that include aspects of their culture—regardless of the ad’s language (Google Hispanic Marketing Forum, 2015).

8. Be consistent with Hispanic marketing

Offering a web page in Spanish is effective, but only if your landing page is in Spanish, too. The same is true for phone orders and support: Pressing “Numero 2” for Spanish on your phone keypad is helpful only if there is a Spanish-speaking representative on the other end. If you’re going to market to consumers in Spanish, be sure to support them throughout the customer journey.

9. Understand Spanish-speaking social media

This is where cultural patterns shift. According to CNN, the most active of all ethnic groups on social media sites are Hispanic adults, at 72%. CNN also points out that even though “Hispanic” is the identity most referenced on social media, the term “Latino” was mentioned more on Twitter. There are many reasons for this, one of which is that Latinos are becoming more prominent in TV shows, magazines, and professional sports.

For example, according to a 2016 Neilson report, 10% of overall NFL TV game viewers are Hispanic. This results in more Tweets on Latinos. The word “Latino” was also searched more on Google in the last few years. Cultural patterns vary by region (within the U.S.) and are also a result of more references to the types of activities, music, and other events that cater to the Latino population.

10. Be aware of cultural diversity

It all comes down to being aware of cultural diversity within any country, where multiple ethnicities and language dialects exist. And although no one is expected to know each dialect and market, there is much benefit and value to thoroughly researching and understanding the various linguistic and cultural differences, as well as the spending patterns within a particular country.

This can be done in many ways, such as hiring local employees or services that are aware of the various differences, as well as knowing the latest research on buying trends, social media trends, etc.

After all, if you are making the effort to market to Spanish speakers, be sure to be able to relate with them the way they relate to one another. Know their local culture, language, and customs. Bottom line: Localize, localize, localize.

To learn more, view the recorded webinar, How to Market to Hispanic Consumers.

About the author

sergio-restrepo-200x240Along with his operations responsibilities, as a digital marketing expert, Sergio provides sales support for Lionbridge Global Marketing Services. In 2007, he founded Darwin Zone, a Costa Rican-based digital marketing agency acquired by Lionbridge in 2014. There, he designed and implemented strategies for global brands including Nestle, 3M, New Balance, SABMiller, Honda, and Johnson & Johnson, among others.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://content.lionbridge.com/10-best-practices-for-marketing-to-hispanic-consumers/


Your Next Big Opportunity: The US Hispanic Market

Source: https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/us-hispanic-market-digital/