Where, when and how: Copa América 2019

If you want to follow it, these are the days and times of the matches of the first group stage. The schedule is the local. (Mexico -2; Argentina =; Chile -1; Colombia -2; Spain +5, US East -1; US West -4)
  • 14/06/19: Brasil vs. Bolivia; 9:30 pm
  • 15/06/19: Venezuela vs. Perú 4:00 pm
  • 15/06/19: Argentina vs. Colombia 7:00 pm
  • 16/06/19: Paraguay vs. Catar 4:00 pm
  • 16/06/19: Uruguay vs. Ecuador 7:00 pm
  • 17/06/19: Japón vs. Chile 8:00 pm
  • 17/06/19: Bolivia vs. Perú 6:30 pm
  • 18/06/19: Brasil vs. Venezuela 9:30 pm
  • 19/06/19: Colombia vs. Catar 6:30 pm
  • 19/06/19: Argentina vs. Paraguay 9:30 pm
  • 20/06/19: Uruguay vs. Japón 8:00 pm
  • 21/06/19: Ecuador vs. Chile 8:00 pm
  • 22/06/19: Perú vs. Brasil 4:00 pm
  • 22/06/19: Bolivia vs. Venezuela 4:00 pm
  • 23/06/19: Catar vs. Argentina 4:00 pm
  • 23/06/19: Colombia vs. Paraguay 4:00 pm
  • 24/06/19: Chile vs. Uruguay 8:00 pm
  • 24/06/19: Ecuador vs. Japón 8:00 pm

You can find all the matches to be played in this table:

como ver la copa america 2019 calendario partidos

 

Source: Digitaltrends

Related posts: Soccer and US Hispanics


360-degree video header

Now, it’s possible: to add a 360-degree header to your post. Check it out!

This is a prototype. Source and license: https://vimeo.com/251750357


Automakers Focus On Hispanic Consumers

How marketers are trying to impact this or other audiences? Well, using new high-end technologies like 360-degree videos, even in the launch of the new models.

There’re new formats like 360-degree video ads, check it out:

if you like, check how a “360-degree video header” works: https://www.reachhispanic.com/360-degree-video-header/


Latino participation in winter sports

Why the ski industry needs more Hispanics skiers and riders.

In looking at the importance of key multicultural populations on winter sports and the impact they have on the ski industry, one group stands out as being poised to deliver.  While the ski industry does need to do more to draw Hispanic families to the resorts, there are already some key factors that make that easier than with other multicultural groups.

In looking at the African American market one thing that gets mentioned in articles is that there are not many African American skiers on the hill, and that lack of diversity presents challenges in making this segment feel welcome.  In contrast, at least in the West, not only is there a notable increase in Hispanic families living and visiting the mountains, but there is also an added benefit of workers from Latin America.

In California & Colorado (and many others), when you go to the resort, many of the workers are seasonal and visiting from other countries.  Every season on a chairlift or even in the parking lot I meet someone who is here for the season from Chile or Argentina and have the opportunity to speak Spanish.

International Student Visas such as Vail’s program bring diversity to resort operations that can translate to a more welcoming experience for latinos.

While not all Hispanic households are Spanish dominant in the U.S.,  just imagine how it feels for someone who may be more comfortable speaking in Spanish, or even just seeing more people from similar backgrounds may make you feel.  Skiing is expensive and for most people not from a cold climate, is not necessarily something that you grew up doing.  This is where the industry can and needs to help.

Tourism boards from Arizona to Washington are actively pursuing multicultural communities to boost tourism.  Visit Denver has a site in multiple languages and actively markets to Hispanic and other communities.  Yet, there are few examples of ski resorts actively marketing to Hispanic, Asian, or African American communities.  At the very least increasing the diversity on the ski hill, will make others from those communities feel more welcome.

RRC Associates Study

So, for affluent communities with the means, the push is to introduce them to the mountains and the benefits of winter recreation.  Creating a great experience similar to that of all skiers and riders will pay great dividends.

More challenging for the industry (especially in the West) is how to involve the local communities, much of which are lower income Hispanic and in many cases undocumented.  Per a great article in Outside Magazine that discusses the issue as well as the work of the Doug  Coombs foundation who offer opportunities to more challenged, local, latino populations in Wyoming.  Many times these are the workers in the community, but reap few of the benefits of living in beautiful mountain communities, this organization helps to bring them onto the hill and further increase participation in the sport.

While this group, may not generate as much interest to resorts trying to sell luxury condos, the fact is that having people from diverse backgrounds enjoying the mountains creates a richer experience for all.

Additional Resources:

Will Multicultural Skiers Save the Ski Industry

NSAA report – Future Demographics

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Tourism Marketing


New Luxury Car

Reaching Hispanic Car Buyers

While the numbers may vary (one projection is that the Hispanic market will represent $1.7 Trillion buying power by 2020), the consensus is that the Hispanic market is massive, and therefore the influence of Hispanic car buyers is a major opportunity for any business.  In this case, let’s look at auto dealers.

Car dealership owners in the U.S. are focused on selling as many cars as possible and as their local or regional market changes they are one of the fastest groups to react to these changes.   While there are major advertising dollars focusing on Hispanic markets from some automakers, the local focus of the dealers means that regardless of the national focus, they may create their local sites, offers and advertising to grab the attention of their market.

Below is an example of from Arlington Toyota of a vehicle walk through in Spanish for their market.

Each market is different, even when looking at the Hispanic market.  The local market in Miami is quite different than the markets in San Francisco, New York or any other.  There are numerous factors including language (Spanish versus English), to cultural backgrounds and differences in country of origin or individuals or family (U.S. born, 3rd generation is different from 1st generation family recently arriving from Guatemala) can be significantly different.  In some markets, the big sellers may be the less expensive vehicles, while in many cases the Hispanic market is purchasing high end luxury cars. (Example from Lexus below) These are the details that local/regional dealerships understand.

Above is an example from JM Lexus showing the key attributes in Spanish of choosing a Lexus.

More than ever there are cost effective options for dealers.  From managing their own sites and social media presence, to working with local publications, to working with multicultural digital specialists to reach Hispanic car buyers. To continue to learn more about reaching these audiences, here are some additional resources:


Working remotely from Chile, Part II

Second working day (check my previous post) and I found an excellent place. In the neighborhood of Providencia, east side of the city, there’s a small shopping center call “Drugstore”. I know it’s confusing but it’s not literally a drugstore, it’s a place full of shops. Maybe in the past the place had an important drugstore but today there are restaurants, cafeterias, handicraft shops, etc.

There’s a place called “Te Verde” with very good coffee and a long table where you can plug your computer and work from there.

Quick note, if you have Diabetes like me, they have a “Kuchen” (an old bakery piece of cake originally from Germany) without sugar. Yes, without sugar. It’s also possible to ask for lunch, most of the alternatives include vegetables and natural fruit juices.

You can be there for hours because the place is quiet, the Wi-Fi is good, you can plug your computer and charge your phone but chairs are kind of uncomfortable to be honest.

If you decide to explore the area for other lunch alternatives, I strongly recommend Soler. It’s a restaurant in the Neighborhood of Suecia and they have a sandwich based on spicy pork. Believe me, you won’t regret. You are right, it’s not for people with diabetes but… there’s nothing than 5 miles can fix it. No?

 

Eduardo


Working remotely from Chile, Part I

I just arrived to Chile, the place where I was born, more or less, 4 decades ago. And today is my first working day from here and I decided to do it from some of the places where I used to work in the past: Santiago Centro.

After 4 years from my last trip, Santiago is different. Without Internet (no Uber, no Whatsapp) and too many changes in the city I feel like a foreign guy.

Certainly, my first option to get some Internet was Starbucks… bummer. For some reason, their Wifi works under a Firewall and I could navigate only in a bunch of sites. I spent $7 for nothing.

Second choice. I went to GAM, it’s a museum and art gallery. This place played an interesting role in the past, 35 years ago, if you are interested, google it. Well, It was impossible to connect the Wifi and also, the place was closed.

Third choice. I went to Centro de Extensión Universidad Católica. Finally, good Internet and reliable. Problem, only works in certain areas and if you would like to take the chance of a coffee, to will out of the range. Also, there’s no chairs to stay for a while.

Final choice of the day. Almost accidentally, I visited BLV Alameda. This is Food Court with many small stores, all of them very very nice. In this place I found a few restaurants (I tried Caesar Salad with a natural juice for $7) and the Wifi was great, fast, no firewall, etc. Also, there’re a restrooms for free. Limitations? You need to bring your computer fully  charged.

Well, I will continue my search and as soon as I get something new, I will put it here.

 

Eduardo


Top 5 Travel Destinations for Latin Americans Within the US.

US is a country made of diversity; one can find people from around the world in just one nation, no matter if they are from Europe, Africa, Asia, or Latin America. Such a wide variety in population translates into a plethora of different tastes when it comes to vacations.

Knowing that fact, we are here to present you with the best traveling destinations for those with latino travel habits.
So, sit tight, and read on; you may just find where to spend these upcoming vacations!

What Do Hispanic Travelers Look For?

Latin Americans are known for their strong preference towards their origins; most people from the southern side of the continent are fond of the beaches and tropical landscapes they grew up with.

Since it’s hard to abandon those tastes, many hispanics look for a better version of what they love and thus plan their trips towards the sunny beaches on the coasts of USA.

As such, when it comes to choosing a destination, a strong preference is evidenced towards warm and tropical locations.
However, there’s a significant opposite end of the hispanic market tourism!

There are also many Latin Americans (myself included) who opt to move towards the contraire of what they grew up with!
From that mindset, we also have a significant portion of the hispanic population gravitating towards the chilling and quiet spots in the US. For them, the north begins to look more attractive and they start setting aside the heat and tropic in favor of parks and cold.

Top Destinations For Latin Americans In The US.

With such a broad selection of hispanic travel habits, we have chosen quite a varied board of options for the hispanic market tourism.

1. Yosemite National Park.

This is a great choice for those whose hispanic travel habits include stepping away from the usual hispanic beaches.


This great, typical park filled with trees that give birth to a wonderful forest is a great sight for those who rather a cool and quiet location.

2. Alaska.

The last on the options catered towards quiet and alternative latino travel habits is the chilling territory of Alaska.
Anyone feeling tired of the Sun and heat will be happy to trade them for the cold and wonderful sight of the aurora borealis dancing in the dark sky.

3. Key West.

A very familiar sight will greet those who head over to this territory filled with beaches and fun locals! People looking for a more “cultural” hispanic market tourism can head over to the beautiful Dry Tortugas National Park via hidroplane or boat and visit the beautiful fort.

4. The Glass Beach.

A century of contamination in the 1900’s ironically gave birth to a beautiful destination.

All the trash thrown by the locals has covered the beach with glass and ceramic, softened with the years. The current sight is a very interesting one that combines the classic tropical beach landscape with the odd decoration.

5. White Sands.

What best destination for those with latino travel habits than the one right on top of Mexico?

This national park is great for those looking for a warm climate and an amazing sight, covered in white sand (hence the name) that looks like snow, coupled with a beautiful series of meadows that are just a pleasure to walk on!


Planning to travel to South America? What about the North of Chile?

Chile is an easy country to visit. For U.S. citizens entering Chile must have a valid passport. U.S. citizens traveling to Chile for recreation, tourism, business, or academic conferences do not need to obtain a visa prior to their arrival in Chile. A Tourist Card will be issued for a stay of up to 90 days.

Santiago is the capital of Chile; it’s a cosmopolitan city with excellent hotels, restaurants, bars and shopping from tiny boutique and craft fairs to giant shopping malls. There are many social and cultural attractions such as art galleries, museums, theaters, opera and ballet, lively nightlife, parks, etc.

Because Chile is a very long piece of land, its extremes are very different; the North is hot and the South is freezing. Well, if you prefer places plenty of sun, certainly the north should be your destination.

In the North of Chile there are thousand of impressive places for visiting and we would like to recommend one: San Pedro de Atacama. Here you can find unique regions like Valle de la Luna, flamingo populations, and sand dunes. For one of the most spectacular places to spend a sunset, do not skip the desert.

The following video is a 360-degree video compilation about the driest desert in the World, the Atacama Desert. To enjoy this immersive video, please click on the video and move it in any direction to watch everything around. If you are using a mobile device, simply drag and drop with your finger to move the point of view of the video  Enjoy it!

 

Because we know that is difficult to image a place like this before to travel but we would like to recommend a website where you can visit “virtually” this place in www.chilein360.com. For sure, you will like to be there in your next vacations.


The Chilean Independence process

The Chilean Independence process

Napoleon’s invasion of Spain and the arrest of Fernando VII in 1808 were two of the fundamental factors in Chileans’ desire for independence. On 18 September 1810 the First National Government Junta was proclaimed and the process of autonomy and liberation from Spanish dominion was underway.

The first National Congress was elected, a Constitutional Regulation was drafted, Chile’s first newspaper La Aurora de Chile was published, and a national flag and coat of arms were created. 18 September is the national day and that is when the independence celebrations are held.

The patriots fight the royalists

The patriots’ initiative was rejected by sectors with ties to the Spanish crown opposed to the idea of independence. Both groups confronted each other militarily beginning in 1814 and the royalists, loyal to Spain, regained control of the country.

From exile in Argentina, Bernardo O’Higgins organized the liberating army and, together with José de San Martín, Governor of Mendoza, he crossed the mountains in 1817 and began the historic phase known as the Patria Nueva (New Homeland). After several confrontations with the royalist forces, the patriots were victorious and declared independence in February 1818. Bernardo O’Higgins was chosen Supreme Director of the nation.

Source: https://www.thisischile.cl/history/independence/?lang=en