The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup is the eighth edition of the FIFA Women’s World Cup,  For the current match, a total of 24 teams qualified for the final tournament.

ChileJamaicaScotland, and South Africa made their Women’s World Cup debuts, while Italy took part in the event for the first time since 1999 and Argentina took part for the first time since 2007BrazilGermanyJapanNigeriaNorwaySweden, and the United States qualified for their eighth World Cup, continuing their streak of qualifying for every World Cup held so far.

For brands, this is a really nice opportunity to reach more consumers. For example, Nike created the following video:

 

Certainly there’s a nice chance to target US Hispanics, since Chile and Argentina are playing in this contest.

If you are looking for a good match, watch US vs Chile: Sunday 06/16 at 12:00. Because US wan 13/0 in the last match, for sure to play against Chile will be interesting.

Source:


Political Outreach to Hispanic Voters - HELP

Really!! Google Translate – Presidential candidates showing ineptitude in reaching out to Hispanic voters.

Reaching Hispanics in language can have numerous pitfalls that even pose a challenge for native Spanish speakers, but the errors being made by political candidates for the top job in the U.S. is an impressive show of laziness.

Politico reviewed numerous Spanish language pages of some presidential candidates and found many to be lacking.  Following is an excerpt from the Politico article: which has some excellent examples of missteps.

While Google Translate can serve as a workable starting point, more often than not it needs a human hand to produce Spanish that would pass muster with a native speaker.

As with any outreach to the Hispanic or any other multicultural audience, if you plan on reaching out in language, it is extremely important to get it right.  If you can’t, then stick to English.

According to Pew Research: Mapping the Latino electorate there were more than 29 million latinos that were eligible to vote in the 2018 midterm elections.  In states such as California (30%), New Mexico (42%), Texas (30%) among others where the percentage of eligible voters being Hispanic, reaching this audience the right way is important.

While acknowledging that Hispanic voters are important is the easy part, the effort by both the Republican National Committee (GOP) as well as the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is lacking.  If the major committees are unable or unwilling to put forth the effort, what can you expect from political candidates.  Some examples of the Latino/Hispanic pages from the major political parties show a severe lack of effort to reach out to this part of the latino electorate.

 

For anyone who has written in a second language, mistakes will happen, and to some extent when you see candidates make the attempt to speak in another language, some mistakes are understandable, but if your campaign or brand is serious about reaching out to bilingual and Spanish dominant Hispanics, there are inexpensive and simple ways to do it.  There are numerous certified translators, qualified multicultural agencies, and most likely a native speaker nearby that can assist.

The Politico article evaluated numerous sites for Democratic presidential candidates and is worth reviewing.  Here is just one example to see where some candidates are missing out.

Additional Resources:

Pew Hispanic: Mapping the Latino electorate

Reach Multicultural: Multicultural Voter Resources

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Political Advertising

Republican National Committee: GOP Hispanic page

Democratic National Committee: Latinos

 


Latino participation in winter sports

Why the ski industry needs more Hispanics skiers and riders.

In looking at the importance of key multicultural populations on winter sports and the impact they have on the ski industry, one group stands out as being poised to deliver.  While the ski industry does need to do more to draw Hispanic families to the resorts, there are already some key factors that make that easier than with other multicultural groups.

In looking at the African American market one thing that gets mentioned in articles is that there are not many African American skiers on the hill, and that lack of diversity presents challenges in making this segment feel welcome.  In contrast, at least in the West, not only is there a notable increase in Hispanic families living and visiting the mountains, but there is also an added benefit of workers from Latin America.

In California & Colorado (and many others), when you go to the resort, many of the workers are seasonal and visiting from other countries.  Every season on a chairlift or even in the parking lot I meet someone who is here for the season from Chile or Argentina and have the opportunity to speak Spanish.

International Student Visas such as Vail’s program bring diversity to resort operations that can translate to a more welcoming experience for latinos.

While not all Hispanic households are Spanish dominant in the U.S.,  just imagine how it feels for someone who may be more comfortable speaking in Spanish, or even just seeing more people from similar backgrounds may make you feel.  Skiing is expensive and for most people not from a cold climate, is not necessarily something that you grew up doing.  This is where the industry can and needs to help.

Tourism boards from Arizona to Washington are actively pursuing multicultural communities to boost tourism.  Visit Denver has a site in multiple languages and actively markets to Hispanic and other communities.  Yet, there are few examples of ski resorts actively marketing to Hispanic, Asian, or African American communities.  At the very least increasing the diversity on the ski hill, will make others from those communities feel more welcome.

RRC Associates Study

So, for affluent communities with the means, the push is to introduce them to the mountains and the benefits of winter recreation.  Creating a great experience similar to that of all skiers and riders will pay great dividends.

More challenging for the industry (especially in the West) is how to involve the local communities, much of which are lower income Hispanic and in many cases undocumented.  Per a great article in Outside Magazine that discusses the issue as well as the work of the Doug  Coombs foundation who offer opportunities to more challenged, local, latino populations in Wyoming.  Many times these are the workers in the community, but reap few of the benefits of living in beautiful mountain communities, this organization helps to bring them onto the hill and further increase participation in the sport.

While this group, may not generate as much interest to resorts trying to sell luxury condos, the fact is that having people from diverse backgrounds enjoying the mountains creates a richer experience for all.

Additional Resources:

Will Multicultural Skiers Save the Ski Industry

NSAA report – Future Demographics

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Tourism Marketing


New Luxury Car

Reaching Hispanic Car Buyers

While the numbers may vary (one projection is that the Hispanic market will represent $1.7 Trillion buying power by 2020), the consensus is that the Hispanic market is massive, and therefore the influence of Hispanic car buyers is a major opportunity for any business.  In this case, let’s look at auto dealers.

Car dealership owners in the U.S. are focused on selling as many cars as possible and as their local or regional market changes they are one of the fastest groups to react to these changes.   While there are major advertising dollars focusing on Hispanic markets from some automakers, the local focus of the dealers means that regardless of the national focus, they may create their local sites, offers and advertising to grab the attention of their market.

Below is an example of from Arlington Toyota of a vehicle walk through in Spanish for their market.

Each market is different, even when looking at the Hispanic market.  The local market in Miami is quite different than the markets in San Francisco, New York or any other.  There are numerous factors including language (Spanish versus English), to cultural backgrounds and differences in country of origin or individuals or family (U.S. born, 3rd generation is different from 1st generation family recently arriving from Guatemala) can be significantly different.  In some markets, the big sellers may be the less expensive vehicles, while in many cases the Hispanic market is purchasing high end luxury cars. (Example from Lexus below) These are the details that local/regional dealerships understand.

Above is an example from JM Lexus showing the key attributes in Spanish of choosing a Lexus.

More than ever there are cost effective options for dealers.  From managing their own sites and social media presence, to working with local publications, to working with multicultural digital specialists to reach Hispanic car buyers. To continue to learn more about reaching these audiences, here are some additional resources:


More Latinos Are Going to College, But In Small Number of Schools

While more Latinos are heading to college than ever before, that trend is not increasing uniformly throughout all U.S. colleges, according to a study released Wednesday. In fact, more than six in 10 Latino students attend a small percentage of schools with large Hispanic populations.

A majority of Latinos attended Hispanic-Serving Institutions in 2014-2015 academic year, according to a study by Excelencia in Education, an organization which has been tracking Latino college enrollment since 2004. The number of HSIs increased by 7 percent in the same year and are concentrated in 18 states.

"I think the highlight here is that Latino enrollment in higher education is increasing, but so is the concentration of Latino students on campuses," said Deborah Santiago, chief operating officer and vice president for policy at Excelencia.

Out of all colleges and universities in the U.S., 13 percent are classified as HSI and 62 percent of Latino college students attend these schools.

To qualify as an HSI, at least 25 percent of the student body must be Hispanic or Latino. There are 435 institutions in the U.S. that fall into that category. Santiago said when you include "emerging HSIs", which have 15-24 percent Latino enrollment rates, another 310 schools qualify.


latino food

IRI Examines New Product Purchasing Habits of U.S. Hispanic Shoppers

The Hispanic community is the fastest-growing ethnic group in the nation and spends more than $94.7 billion on CPG products annually. Because Hispanics are one of the most sought-after ethnic groups in the retail grocery market, IRI is diving deeper into last year’s most successful CPG launches to better understand Hispanics and New Product Pacesetters. CPG marketers have a great opportunity to capture more shopping dollars from Hispanic consumers, especially if they understand some key nuances in their attitudes and preferences regarding new products, compared to those of the general consumer population.

“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly”

Tweet this

“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly,” said Susan Viamari, vice president of Thought Leadership for IRI. “Unfortunately, most marketers don’t have easy access to detailed information on what Hispanic shoppers are buying, including in key CPG categories. This significantly limits new growth opportunities for brands, so we examined what Hispanics are buying, and even why they are buying products, to help marketers engage with these very important consumers.”

While Hispanic buying power is concentrated in select markets, including New Mexico, Texas, California, Florida, Nevada, Colorado, New Jersey, New York and Illinois, their interest in new products is spread across retail departments. Among those consumers who consider themselves avid new product adopters, there is a particular interest in the following departments (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

--

Food:

26%, 29%, 25%, 23%
--

Beverage:

19%, 20%, 13%, 16%
--

Beauty/Personal Care:

19%, 24%, 29%, 12%
--

Home Care:

13%, 20%, 29%, 11%
--

Health Care:

10%, 13%, 20%, 9%
--

Pet Care:

9%, 8%, 9%, 6%

Top-Selling Food and Beverage Launches

Based on the most successful CPG launches in the 2017 New Product Pacesetters report, IRI uncovered the top-selling food and beverage products for Hispanic consumers:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Food and Beverage Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Halo Top® 93
2. Hillshire® Snacking 117
3. Chobani® Drinks 102
4. GOOD THiNS® 111
5. Oscar Mayer® Natural 116
6. Dunkin' Donuts® Iced Coffee 72
7. Cracker Barrel® Macaroni & Cheese 143
8. Birds Eye® Steamfresh® Veggie Made 97
9. SMARTMADE by Smart Ones® 119
10. POWERADE® X ION4® 83

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage/Hispanic Specialty Panel

The mix of healthy and indulgent products found in the top-10 ranking truly reflects Hispanics’ attitudes toward eating. For instance, 36 percent of Hispanics say they eat healthy half of the time and eat whatever they want the other half. An additional 36 percent of Hispanic consumers say they eat healthy 80 percent of the time and allow for indulgences 20 percent of the time. So, moderation is the key for most Hispanics.

The top healthy eating considerations vary significantly across Hispanic sectors (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

--

Avoiding processed foods:

58%, 54%, 31%, 56%
--

The right mix of different types of food:

44%, 36%, 36%, 42%
--

Natural foods:

30%, 41%, 24%, 23%
--

Organic foods:

20%, 19%, 40%, 15%
--

Include higher-calorie treats in moderation:

10%, 6%, 21%, 11%

Top-Selling Non-Food Launches

Forty percent of Pacesetter brands that hit the mark with Hispanics tout “more natural,” “organic,” “herbal,” or “holistic” attributes, which also helped shape the top-10 non-food ranking:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Non-Food Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Fancy Feast® Medleys® 149
2. Garnier® Whole Blends 104
3. Carol’s Daughter® 164
4. Herbal Essences® Bio:Renew 100
5. Copper Chef® 95
6. GLISS® Hair Repair® 96
7. Dove® Nutritive Solutions 116
8. Dentalife® 87
9. Red Copper® 105
10. OxiClean HD 140

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage™/Hispanic Specialty Panel

Hispanics are looking for new non-food products that provide new health benefits and faster results. Key considerations for new products include (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

--

Offers longer-lasting relief compared to existing alternatives:

31%, 28%, 32%, 32%
--

Offers faster relief than existing products:

30%, 25%, 14%, 30%
--

Treats multiple symptoms:

32%, 33%, 29%, 27%
--

Appeals to many people in my household:

27%, 28%, 25%, 21%
--

Offers new health benefits:

26%, 28%, 35%, 21%

“Hispanics are a highly diverse group, based on factors such as age, income, media preferences and language preference — English-preferred, bilingual or Spanish-preferred,” said Staci Covkin, principal of Consumer and Shopper Marketing for IRI. “Attracting Hispanics requires an understanding of these language preferences, along with their digital and social preferences, to quickly see a huge opportunity for CPG across food, beauty, home and health care brands. Aligning a new product launch with the needs of Hispanic shoppers is rapidly becoming a critical success factor for sustained CPG and retail growth, so improved insights and activation of these shoppers can result in significant sales and market share uplift.”

For the complete analysis on Hispanics and New Product Trends, click here. For more information, contact IRI at customerinteractioncenter@IRIworldwide.com

 

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180606005323/en/IRI-Examines-New-Product-Purchasing-Habits-U.S.


Soccer

Brands that Score Big Reaching Hispanics During the World Cup

Organized by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the month-long event occurs every four years as 32 national soccer teams contend for the world champion title. As one of the world’s largest sporting events, the World Cup serves as an incredibly effective communications platform spanning across all languages, socioeconomic backgrounds and countries of origin to deliver an intense and emotional affair for soccer fanatics and non-sports viewers alike.

Although the U.S. will not be competing this year, there’s still a great opportunity to connect with an important and growing demographic — Hispanics. U.S. Hispanics, who make up nearly 18 percent of the population, feel tremendous excitement, and passion for the sport and are ready to follow this quadrennial tournament from beginning to end. According to a recent ThinkNow study, nine of ten Hispanics in the U.S. plan to watch the World Cup. The World Cup triggers two core values in the U.S. Hispanic culture: collectiveness and patriotism. Each soccer match gives Hispanics an opportunity to share a communal experience with their loved ones and friends while expressing their national pride.

These three brands that are doing an excellent job reaching the U.S. Hispanic audience through the World Cup.

1. Telemundo: Este mundial lo vivimos juntos por Telemundo (We live this world cup together on Telemundo)

Back in 2011, the Telemundo network bought the exclusive Spanish-language rights to broadcast the 2018 World Cup. As the title suggests, Telemundo is engaging with their viewers by relating to the collective nature of the World Cup. The video’s message is that even though it is a competition and there is rivalry between teams, the event unifies people. The brand also appeals to various segments of the U.S. Hispanic population by showing characters of different ages, genders and ethnicities.

2. Sprint: Sprint gets you in Fútbol Mode

Instead of going for “Soccer Mode,” telecommunications company Sprint aptly named this campaign “Fútbol Mode,” as the game is generally known as “football” in most of the world. Still, given that in the U.S. “football” is associated with American football, they opted for the Spanish spelling of the word. The brand is also engaging in Spanish and English. This is a smart move because a high percentage of U.S. Hispanic consumers are bilingual. In addition, Sprint is targeting their customers’ heritage by holding a contest that gives participants a chance to meet some of the most famous Hispanic soccer players in history, including Colombian Carlos “El Pibe” Valderrama and Mexicans Jorge Campos and Claudio "El Emperador" Suárez.

3. Coca-Cola: ¿Listos para el Mundial? (Ready for the World Cup?)

In this ad, Coca-Cola is targeting a specific segment of the Hispanic population. The last time the Peru national football team played in a World Cup was in 1982. After 36 years, the team nicknamed La Blanquirroja (The White and Red) finally qualified and Peruvians could not be more proud. Coca-Cola digs deeper and goes beyond just showing a Hispanic family on a couch watching a soccer match. The brand demonstrates that they understand the nuances of being a fan and what is important for a team like Peru.

The World Cup not only transcends sports, it allows brands the opportunity to reach a massive, diverse audience and connect with them on a deep, emotional level. If you’d like ideas about how to reach the multicultural consumers, we are here to help.

Source: https://themooreagency.com/blog/brands-that-score-big-reaching-hispanics-during-the-world-cup


When It Comes To The Language Of Fútbol, Hispanic Americans Know It Best

Around the globe, few things are as ubiquitous as the sport of fútbol, le foot, calcio, or, as it’s called in the U.S., soccer.

While Americans have their own special moniker for it, the sport has certainly made its own imprint in the U.S. Soccer’s influence and power in the world of televised sports is no exception.  Behind this driving force are U.S. Hispanic viewers, whose consumption habits give televised soccer a unique and powerful profile.

So what does that profile look like?

Sports viewership typically varies by race and ethnicity, and for soccer, U.S. Hispanic viewers accounted for the vast majority of viewership in 2017. In fact, Hispanics accounted for an overwhelming 68% of soccer’s viewership during the year, compared to about 12% of viewership to all sports. Over 97 million people watched at least six minutes of a soccer match last year, and over 32 million of them were Hispanic.

When looking at Hispanic TV homes in the U.S. exclusively, about 61% of their residents have watched at least six minutes of a soccer game—more than any other race or ethnicity.

The 61% reach percentage is nearly double that of the U.S. overall percentage. But soccer doesn’t just appeal to Hispanic viewers. In 2017, at least a quarter of all measured races/ethnicities watched soccer, including 30% of African-American viewers and 25% of Asian-American viewers.

Looking deeper into the Hispanic soccer viewer reveals a unique profile—they’re younger than non-Hispanic viewers and Spanish-language dominant.

The compositional breakdown of soccer’s audience reveals that 42% of Hispanic soccer viewers are under the age of 35, compared to 31% of non-Hispanic viewers. Of these young viewers, over a quarter of them are within the key buying demographic (18-34). Moreover, 16% of them are in the 2-17 demo—a group vital to growth and long-term sustainability. For non-Hispanics, about 10% of viewership stemmed from the 2-17 demo.

While soccer attracts a growing and increasingly influential demographic in Hispanics, what may be most intriguing about its viewership is its ability to attract a specific, yet sizeable subset of the demo: Spanish-language dominant Hispanics.

Within the Hispanic homes that watch soccer matches, a whopping 82% of the audience speaks Spanish as their dominant language, whereas only 13% speak English as their main language.

Notably, Spanish-dominant viewers have seemingly had a large impact on how and where soccer matches are viewed. Of all persons watching the matches, one-third of its gross minutes are viewed on English-language networks, whereas the other two-thirds are spent on Spanish-language networks.

While a large audience of Spanish-speaking viewers may evidently correlate with increased viewing to Spanish-language networks, what might easily be overlooked is the contribution from English-speaking viewers. Hispanic viewers who speak only English spent a majority of their soccer viewing time via English-language networks—but not by much.

About 40% of their soccer viewing was done on Spanish language networks, a sizeable portion considering the language difference. When looking at Hispanic viewers who speak mostly English, the share of their soccer viewing on Spanish-language networks ballooned to 83%. In essence, Spanish-language networks reached their main audience by televising soccer matches, but with the added benefit of bringing in adjacent English-speaking crowds as well.

Soccer, as it seems, successfully crosses language barriers in U.S. television programming and can bring advertisers closer to the booming Hispanic demographic, no matter what their language preference.

METHODOLOGY

Universe Estimates (000): Composite: 304,500. Hispanic: 53,159. Non-Hisp White: 190,838. Non-Hisp Black: 38,639. Non-Hisp Asian (Non-Black, Non-White): 13,271. Non-Hisp Other (Non-Asian): 5,694.

The insights in this article were derived from the following source:

  • Nielsen NPower Program Report, Dec. 26, 2016 – Dec. 31, 2017. Based on live soccer games live+7. Repeats, programs <10 minutes and sustainers have been excluded. All programs based on sports event summary type codes. Reach and frequency based on 6+ minute qualifier.

 

Source: Nielsen


US Hispanics

Let's talk about US Hispanics

About US Hispanics

The demographics of Hispanic and Latino Americans depict a population that is the second-largest ethnic group in the United States, 52 million people or 16.7% of the national population, of them, 47 Million are American citizens.

We found this interesting video about US Hispanics and we would like to share it with you.

if you want to watch more videos like this one: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=us+hispanics


canary in the coal mine Venezuala is in trouble

Asylum applications - canary in the coal mine

With pending elections throughout many countries in Latin America, the spotlight is on the numerous challenges facing the region, and specifically the Venezuela elections.  From organizations fighting "fake news" in Mexico elections to those that are a foregone conclusion such as Venezuela.  Elections have a ripple effect throughout all of the americas and one look no further than asylum applications and immigration numbers to see which countries are in the most trouble.  In a CNN article regarding Venezuelans fleeing the situation in Venezuela a couple of pictures tell the story.

Asylum applications 2017 comparing Venezuela, China and Mexico

Asylum Applications from Venezualans to US 2015-16

The key reason that individuals or families uproot and move to another country where there is still uncertainty is because they are almost certain that the current situation will not improve in the near term.  Whether civil war such as that of Colombia, to gangs such as Central America, to economic mismanagement a la Venezuela immigrants and asylum seekers are merely looking to improve their situation.

I was traveling in Venezuela shortly after the election of Hugo Chavez.  During my travels I met an executive from a global CPG company and very quickly it was evident that they saw the writing on the wall and were going to start moving many key assets out of the country.  Sure enough, the government started to implement policies that made it almost impossible for companies to do business in the country (most recently the government took over Kellogg's facilities).  For a summary of the current situation in Venezuela this segment from Last Week Tonight with John Oliver has brief rundown prior to the Venezuela elections.

 

For the first time Venezuelan asylum seekers to the United States have outnumbered that of Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador.  Just like a major influx in Colombian asylum seekers in the past (which has since calmed as the country has stabilized and prospered), one key statistic to signal where in the world major problems are brewing is asylum applications.

While the current government in Venezuela is sure to win the "election" on Sunday May 20, 2018, the more important questions is whether the people of the country will survive another six year term or if something changes.