US Hispanics

Let's talk about US Hispanics

About US Hispanics

The demographics of Hispanic and Latino Americans depict a population that is the second-largest ethnic group in the United States, 52 million people or 16.7% of the national population, of them, 47 Million are American citizens.

We found this interesting video about US Hispanics and we would like to share it with you.

if you want to watch more videos like this one: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=us+hispanics


canary in the coal mine Venezuala is in trouble

Asylum applications - canary in the coal mine

With pending elections throughout many countries in Latin America, the spotlight is on the numerous challenges facing the region, and specifically the Venezuela elections.  From organizations fighting "fake news" in Mexico elections to those that are a foregone conclusion such as Venezuela.  Elections have a ripple effect throughout all of the americas and one look no further than asylum applications and immigration numbers to see which countries are in the most trouble.  In a CNN article regarding Venezuelans fleeing the situation in Venezuela a couple of pictures tell the story.

Asylum applications 2017 comparing Venezuela, China and Mexico

Asylum Applications from Venezualans to US 2015-16

The key reason that individuals or families uproot and move to another country where there is still uncertainty is because they are almost certain that the current situation will not improve in the near term.  Whether civil war such as that of Colombia, to gangs such as Central America, to economic mismanagement a la Venezuela immigrants and asylum seekers are merely looking to improve their situation.

I was traveling in Venezuela shortly after the election of Hugo Chavez.  During my travels I met an executive from a global CPG company and very quickly it was evident that they saw the writing on the wall and were going to start moving many key assets out of the country.  Sure enough, the government started to implement policies that made it almost impossible for companies to do business in the country (most recently the government took over Kellogg's facilities).  For a summary of the current situation in Venezuela this segment from Last Week Tonight with John Oliver has brief rundown prior to the Venezuela elections.

 

For the first time Venezuelan asylum seekers to the United States have outnumbered that of Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador.  Just like a major influx in Colombian asylum seekers in the past (which has since calmed as the country has stabilized and prospered), one key statistic to signal where in the world major problems are brewing is asylum applications.

While the current government in Venezuela is sure to win the "election" on Sunday May 20, 2018, the more important questions is whether the people of the country will survive another six year term or if something changes.

 


5 tips to reach Hispanic consumers

Hispanic consumers continue to be one of the most important demographic groups in the U.S.

This young and rapidly growing cohort is driving population growth: The number of Hispanic Americans is expected to grow by 7.7 million people by 2026, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. They’re also driving restaurant industry traffic and dollars spent, according to The NPD Group/CREST Hispanic via Univision Communications.

“Hispanics consistently have higher average eater checks across QSR, midscale and casual dining,” said Peter Filiaci, vice president of strategy and insights for Univision. “And what seems to have most captured the attention of marketers is that Spanish-dominant Hispanics have even higher average eater checks than Hispanics overall.”

While many restaurant chains are already marketing specifically to Hispanic consumers — both Spanish- and English-dominant speakers alike — how can you make sure your message resonates with them? Here are five key trends to consider:

1. Be specific. The Hispanic demographic group has members of many different cultures, stages of acculturation, ages and language preferences. Your target audience will inform the campaign you craft. For instance, if you want to reach Millennial Hispanic consumers, develop a digital or mobile campaign. Spartanburg, S.C.-based Denny’s did just that by meeting these consumers where they live, on social media, by creating a Denny’s Latino Facebook page. The strategy makes sense: 68 percent of all Hispanic consumers use some kind of social network, compared with 58 percent of non-Hispanic consumers, according to several studies cited by Denny’s. “While Hispanics represent approximately 17 percent of the U.S. population, the Hispanic market represents nearly one third of our customer base, and is one of the fastest-growing customer segments for Denny’s,” said John Dillon, Denny’s CMO.

2. Talk the talk. Not all Hispanic consumers speak Spanish, but the language is still a foundation for connecting with their culture. Eighty-seven percent of Hispanic consumers, including both Spanish- and English-dominant speakers, say they appreciate businesses that communicate with them in Spanish, according to Kantar Futures via Univision Communications. And 73 percent of Hispanic consumers say more advertising should be specifically directed at their demographic group. Having Spanish-language marketing materials and hiring Spanish-speaking staff can go a long way towards building a long-lasting relationship with Hispanic consumers. “We have to make it easy for [Hispanic consumers] to have a menu that they can read,” said NPD foodservice industry analyst Bonnie Riggs. “That makes them feel like you want them in your restaurant … and that’s going to get them to come to your restaurant more often. That’s a competitive point of difference in attracting these folks.”

3. Bigger is better. Hispanic consumers tend to visit restaurants in larger groups than non-Hispanic consumers, and family is a priority. Hispanic consumers dine with their children during 42 percent of restaurant visits, compared with 30 percent of the time for non-Hispanic consumers, according to The NPD Group. “While value and convenience are certainly important to all consumers, in terms of driving trial, they seem to be more important to non-Hispanic consumers, while ‘being a fun place to take your family’ and ‘a place where your kids want to go’ are among the top trial drivers for Hispanics,” Filiaci said. Hispanic consumers also tend to opt for dine-in options, so while you beef up your delivery program, make sure not to neglect dining areas, and make them appealing to larger groups. And don’t forget family-friendly options like a thoughtful kids’ menu.

4. Spice it up. As the size and influence of the Hispanic consumer group has grown, so has its impact on the flavors many restaurants offer. “The growing Asian and Hispanic populations in the U.S. have introduced new flavors into the American diet, and many of these flavors are now mainstays in our kitchens and on menus,” said Ann Roberts, vice president of The NPD Group’s SupplyTrack, in a press release. The dollar amount of spices and seasonings shipped to restaurants and foodservice outlets from broadline distributors rose 7 percent year over year, according to NPD’s SupplyTrack. For instance, the amount of chili peppers, including habanero and others common in Latin cuisine, shipped to restaurants increased 12 percent. And more flavors popular with Hispanic consumers are gaining popularity, such as hibiscus and dragon fruit. The impact is being felt across all consumer groups, with 75 percent of American adults saying they are open to trying new foods, according to NPD.

5. Think ahead. Hispanic consumers are increasingly concerned with the freshness and the quality of food served at restaurants, as well as food that is considered environmentally friendly and socially responsible, according to Filiaci. “This is probably not surprising given that the Hispanic population skews so much younger, with a median age more than 10 years younger than the non-Hispanic population,” he said.

 

Source: http://www.nrn.com/consumer-trends/5-tips-reach-hispanic-consumers


Hispanic marketing - still relevant?

Is Hispanic marketing still relevant?  In all but the most remote places, latino influence in the United States is hard to miss, so of course it is.

Multicultural audiences continue to grow in size and importance and the Hispanic audience is one of the most important.  The U.S. Hispanic market has massive influence on the success businesses as well as on American culture.  Almost, if not all major cities in the U.S. have integrated latino food, music, culture, and even street signs into their metro area.    What is always being debated is how to reach this segment.  From a recent media post article there were some key points that highlighted some interesting items.

Language:  While to percentage of Hispanics that are proficient in English has risen swiftly, the percentage of Hispanics that stream entertainment in Spanish has also increased significantly (even greater among Hispanic millennials).  

Boy with Sombrero lazy Hispanic marketing.
Some hispanic marketing attempts are less than ideal.

Influence:  While the population growth is still strong, it has slowed somewhat, yet the integration of the segment into American culture is stronger than ever.  In business ownership the Hispanic community now comprises ownership of 12% of all U.S. business.

Many marketers take the approach of adding a stock photo of a latino looking person to an ad, check a box on whatever programmatic platform and call it a day.  While there are some that fully integrate a “total market” strategy” incorporating cultural relevance, language, etc with an overall cohesive strategy,  but that seems to fall more to Toyota, P&G, Coca Cola and other major advertisers.  

The U.S. Hispanic segment is one of the most important segments and represents major buying power and influence.  It is time for marketers to pay more than lip service to the importance of the group.  There are numerous factors in these decisions such as time, budget, and need.  However there are numerous options to reach this segment through focused media, and utilizing agencies that specialize in multicultural segments that are more effective and don't necessarily require utilizing an entire advertising budget.

 

 

 


Bank of America study shows continued confidence among Hispanics

Hispanic-owned small businesses remain one of the fastest-growing segments of the small business economy, creating jobs and growing revenue. Read on for highlights from the 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight, a survey of 394 small business owners (SBOs) across the country.

Confident about growth

Survey respondents expressed confidence about the economic environment, their business outlooks and opportunities for growth in 2018.

  • 60% expect their local economy to improve in the year ahead, and 67% think the same of the national economy.
  • 71% expect their revenue to increase in 2018, 37% plan to hire, and 26% intend to apply for a loan.
  • 77% plan to grow their business over the next five years.
  • 65% believe Hispanic SBOs face unique business challenges compared to non-Hispanics, although many feel their heritage has been an advantage.
  • 88% believe the Hispanic small business environment will strengthen in the next 10 years.

Hispanic SBOs lead stats in social media usage

The Spotlight also revealed that Hispanic SBOs rely more on digital tools and social media than the average small business owner.

  • 93% of Hispanic SBOs use digital tools in the day-to-day running of their business (vs 74% of SBOs on average), including 50% who use digital banking.
  • 76% rely on social media to help run their business (vs 41% of SBOs on average), primarily using it for the following:
    • Marketing (78%)
    • Networking (76%)
    • Sharing updates with customers (74%)
    • Hiring employees (57%)
  • 53% say social media has had a positive impact on their business' bottom line (vs. 30% of SBOs on average).

Hispanic SBOs leverage digital tools, social media to fuel success. You should too.

Google research identifies Hispanics as being ahead of the curve when it comes to digital technology. They lead the general population in terms of adoption of new devices, are “power users” of mobile and over-index in video consumption.* The 2018 Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight uncovered ways in which forward-thinking Hispanic SBOs use technology to successfully run their businesses, reach new customers, and hire employees.

Read the complete 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight

Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight

GfK Public Affairs and Corporate Communications conducted the Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight survey between August 8 and September 28, 2017 using a pre-recruited online sample of Hispanic and non-Hispanic small business owners. GfK contacted a national sample of 1,013 small business owners in the United States with annual revenue between $100,000 and $4,999,999 and employing between 2 and 99 employees, as well as 394 interviews among Hispanic small business owners, 149 of whom were primary Spanish speakers. The final results were weighted to national benchmark standards for size, revenue and region, and, for the Hispanic augment, whether the respondents were primarily English-speaking or Spanish-speaking.

*Source: Your Next Big Opportunity: The U.S. Hispanic Market, Lisa Gevelber / Jul 2014 I Mobile, Video, Consumer Insights
https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/us-hispanic-market-digital/

 

Source: 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight
https://smallbusinessonlinecommunity.bankofamerica.com/community/hispanic-owners-report

Source: http://sbbankers.bankofamerica.com/newsletter/March-2018#article-1


Hispanic community continues to drive homeownership growth

The Hispanic community continues to drive homeownership growth in the U.S., according to the latest State of Hispanic Homeownership report released by the Hispanic Wealth Project and the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals.

The Hispanic homeownership rate of 46.2% for 2017 showed an increase of 0.2% from 2016’s rate, leading Hispanics to become the only demographic to have increased their homeownership rate for the last three consecutive years.

Over the past decade, non-Hispanic whites have lost 1.9 million homeowners and were the only demographic to experience a net loss over this period of time.

The surge in Hispanic homeownership rate can be contributed, in part, to the exploding population growth. Currently the country’s 58.6 million U.S. Hispanics account for more of the population growth than any other demographic.

What’s more, Hispanics accounted for 265,000, or 28.6%, of total U.S. household formations in 2017. Hispanics are even projected to lead U.S. household growth, adding 6 million additional Hispanic households by 2024.

Hispanic households also have larger sizes at 3.25, the largest household size in comparison to all other U.S. racial and ethnic demographics. This larger size can be contributed to factors such as multigenerational living, an emerging trend HousingWire explored in the February magazine.

However, despite all of these positive trends, Hispanics still face several challenges when it comes to owning a home.

The report shows that more than half of the country’s Hispanic population continues to be located in California with 15.3 million, Texas with 10.9 million and Florida with 5.1 million.

And it is this concentration that hurt Hispanic homeownership growth in 2017. The map below shows 2017’s natural disasters including the hurricanes and California wildfires hit the hardest in areas with heavy concentrations of the Hispanic population.

Click to Enlarge

Hispanic homeownership

(Source: California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Census Bureau)

Another factor hindering Hispanic homeownership growth was affordability. The largest home price gains in 2017 were in California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Washington, all of which, coincidentally, have substantial and growing Hispanic populations.

Immigration and, more specifically, deportations have also played a major role in the state of the Hispanic homeownership rate. Interior enforcement increased dramatically for the year ending in September 2017, with ICE reporting an increase of 36% for interior removals. Over that same period of time, administrative arrests by ICE also increased by 42%.

What’s more, with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program under threat, and no deadline in sight for a resolution, many DACA recipients will hold back from buying a home due to the uncertainty, the report states.


2018 Diversity Calendar of Events

The United States is rich with diversity and if there was any question, just have a look at the diversity of our celebrations. From Martin Luther King day in January, Black History month in February, Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage month (May) to Hispanic Heritage month (September/October) to name just a few.

Have a look at the full break down from Diversity Best Practices and I'm sure you will find some that you weren't even aware of (ex. Krishna Janmashtami.....will let you find that one in the list).

Here are some key ones that should be on the minds of  multicultural marketers.

January

January 15: Martin Luther King Day commemorates the birth of Martin Luther King, Jr., the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize and an activist for non-violent social change until his assassination in 1968.

February
February is Black History Month in the United States and Canada.

February 9-25 Olympics PyeongChang:  OK, not an officially on diversity calendars, but is a celebration of diversity in athletics, athletes and cultures.

February 16: Lunar New Year, one of the most sacred of all traditional Chinese holidays, a time of family reunion and celebration. Lunar New Year is also celebrated at this time in Japan, Korea, Vietnam and Mongolia.

March
March is Women’s History Month.

May
May is Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in the United States.

June
June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month.

2018 World Cup June 14-July 15, 2018

July
2018 FIFA World Cup

September
From September 15th to October 15th is Hispanic Heritage Month. This month corresponds with Mexican Independence Day, which is celebrated on September 16, and recognizes the revolution in 1810 that ended Spanish dictatorship.

October
October 8: Indigenous Peoples / Columbus day.  Many cities in the U.S. have been stepping away from "Columbus day" in favor of "Indigenous People's day."  See some background here

November / December

Including the likes of Thanksgiving, Black Friday, Cyber Monday, Christmas and New Years this period is key for marketers.  After all it seems that Toyotathon is almost a national holiday.

 

 

 


U.S. Hispanics and mobile growth

According to Roberto Orci “Hispanics of every segment are growing at a faster rate than the general market... you would rightly conclude that Hispanics are a big part of the mobile market today and tomorrow.’’ Mobile devices are ubiquitous, particularly with Hispanics. Companies that do not have a well-defined Hispanic mobile strategy are destined to lose out on the most brand-cognizant and more importantly ‘’connected’’ U.S. demographic.

As more Hispanics embrace mobile technologies, they will also spur demand for innovative content, new media, and advertising to meet their diverse set tastes and preferences. The metric for success to a Hispanic mobile advertising campaign ‘’done right’’ will not be measured by followers and likes, but by brands that monitor the meaningful pulse of their culture and technology adoption. It’s clear that Hispanics will play a key role in defining the convergence of our digital and offline worlds.

Top 3 Major findings among Hispanics according to Zpryme research

  1. When it comes to mobile device brand loyalty, only a small percentage (12.3%) said they would not change mobile device brands for any reason.
  2. Although 27.4% said they currently used an Android smartphone, 31.3% said their next smartphone purchase would be an iPhone. Only 9.6% said their next smartphone purchase would be an Android.
  3. Six out of ten (63.4%) spent at least three hours per day on the internet, while four out of ten (41.0%) spent at least three hours per day on their mobile phone.

The breakdown of the above findings

  1. Device Used to Connect to the Internet

For the type of internet connection, the sample reported: laptop most often (70.7%), followed by desktop PC (59.1%), smartphone (41.3%), and tablet (18.7%).

  1. Smartphone Type

When asked what type of smartphone they have, respondents said Android (27.4%), Apple (20.9%), and Blackberry (7.4%).

  1. Next Mobile Phone to Purchase

A last question asked what type of cell phone their next one would be. The Apple iPhone was the most popular choice by far at 31.3%, indicating their next phone would be an iPhone.

  1. Mobile Device Ownership

The types of mobile devices Hispanics currently own were: laptop (69.7%), smartphone (51.5%), iPod (41.8%), tablet (18.8%), netbook (14.1%), and e-reader (11.1%). Another 11.1% of the sample said they didn’t own a mobile device.

  1. Mobile Device Likely to Purchase

Over the next 6 months, 24.1% Hispanics indicated they were most likely to purchase smartphones, 21.1% for laptops, 18.1% for tablets, 17.3% for iPods, 11.6% for E-reader and 10.6% will purchase Netbook.

  1. Time Spent on Mobile Phone

Four of ten (41.0%) spent at least three hours per day on their phone. 28.9% spent less than one hour on their phones, 30.1% spent 1-2 hours of phone using their phones, 25.3% spent 3-5 hours , 8.4% spent 6-8 hours and 7.3% spent over 8 hours on their phones on a daily basis.

So therefore from the information above one could deduce that Hispanic people will be hitting iphone market very soon but network provider should not expect the majority of them to be always online.

 

PD: Considerate to read our article about how to get a mobile service for free.


SafeLink program: FREE minutes, text & data

Recently Alcance Media has started to work with a U.S. Government program that assists eligible families with phone, text, and data and helps families in need stay connected.  SafeLink's Free Wireless Program provided by Tracphone Wireless in conjunction with the Lifeline government benefit program allows qualified users with an applicable mobile device to access these benefits. Through an easy online application (can be downloaded as well) you can find out quickly if you qualify for benefits.

Cell phone service: Now Free!

Online application is through the website for SafeLink's Free Wireless Program


U.S. Census Bureau | American Community Survey

While the last United States Census was conducted in 2010 and the next is scheduled for 2020, there is the American Community Survey which is an ongoing survey that can work in conjunction with the Census data to see changes in the characteristics of the population of the United States.  This is especially useful for multicultural marketers as immigration and movement patterns are continually changing and doing so at a rapid pace.