Latin American elections 2019

2019 Elections in Central & South America: Improvement or Status Quo?

On the heels of the 2018 elections that brought Colombia’s (Ivan Duque), Mexico’s (AMLO Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador) and Brazil’s (Jair Bolsonaro) new leaders to the top post in Latin America, the 2019 elections may not be seen as reaching the same level of impact on the world stage.  However, for the six countries planning elections in 2019, elections are always key to defining whether the future for which path these countries take.

Latin American Countries with elections in 2019

  • Argentina
  • Uruguay
  • Bolivia
  • Panama
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala

For details of the election timing and key concerns, Americas Society / Council of the Americas is a great resource.

While Argentina represents the largest economy and a country facing numerous challenges, for the U.S., there is definitely a focus on Central America which is a key source of the immigration debate.

For Central America, the challenge is how to combat the violence and corruption that has been a key challenge to these developing countries.  For example, Guatemalans, who in the last election elected an ex comedian on a slogan of  “not a thief, nor a crook” who has ended up in a constitutional showdown with the UN-backed anticorruption CICIG and seems to be the opposite of his slogan.  Will there be a return to politics as normal, or will the next president go beyond slogans and actually embrace international anticorruption efforts.

No Easy Answers:

There are no easy answers for many of these countries.  While Argentina is facing a recession and inflation after Macri’s first term is trying to help the country rebound from more than a decade of Kirchner’s, Guatemala and Bolivia have constitutional challenges, and countries such as El Salvador have spent so many years of violence there are questions as to whether any politician will be able to make significant changes and bring stability to their countries.

Is there Hope?

As long as the people have a choice and elections are relatively fair, the politicians at the very least have to answer to the public.  Large protests against Guatemala’s president trying to oust the UN backed CiCIG to the judicial systems still maintaining some sort of check on power there is some hope.  However the road is full of challenges for many of these countries.


Video, importance of the Hispanic market

Audiences are in constant evolution but one of the most dynamic segment is the US Hispanic. This market is rapidly developing in a changing world.

Just a couple of empirical notes. Hispanics consume more mobile video content on social media than any other ethnic group. Currently, the Hispanic consumer views 66% more video content on their smartphones every week than non-Hispanic consumers.

Digital video has caught on with Hispanics. Eight in 10 use subscription services, with Netflix atop the list. Many use streaming services more than traditional TV—a trend poised to accelerate as more Hispanic-oriented content comes online (emarketer.com).

 

Why this segment market is important?

In the first place, Hispanic Americans projected to account for roughly a third of the US population by 2050, the time to start targeting this market may be now (thenextweb.com). Maybe to can check our post about Hispanic drive homeownership growth.

In the second place, they are already a connected segment. “Hispanic consumers in the U.S. are now considered a very connected and digital first community. Effective outreach to different cultures within the hispanic market can spread like wildfire down to their home countries,” wrote Nick Kyriakides, COO at NetTALK. When it comes to marketing to this market, it is important to leverage digital channels.

This is why many companies are trying to implement more video based services. For example Entel, among Chile’s largest telecommunication companies, recently introduced a new video platform powered by the Kaltura TV Platform. What they are trying to do is to push their platform and get more exposure for brands and advertisers willing to target this market.

Source: https://corp.kaltura.com

For sure, in the short term the video arena will be full of rude competition. The good news is this kind of scenarios are always good for consumers and an interesting opportunities for new businesses.

Finally, if you want to learn more about the Best Practices to Reach a Diverse Audience, check this post on: https://www.reachmulticultural.com/


Latino participation in winter sports

Why the ski industry needs more Hispanics skiers and riders.

In looking at the importance of key multicultural populations on winter sports and the impact they have on the ski industry, one group stands out as being poised to deliver.  While the ski industry does need to do more to draw Hispanic families to the resorts, there are already some key factors that make that easier than with other multicultural groups.

In looking at the African American market one thing that gets mentioned in articles is that there are not many African American skiers on the hill, and that lack of diversity presents challenges in making this segment feel welcome.  In contrast, at least in the West, not only is there a notable increase in Hispanic families living and visiting the mountains, but there is also an added benefit of workers from Latin America.

In California & Colorado (and many others), when you go to the resort, many of the workers are seasonal and visiting from other countries.  Every season on a chairlift or even in the parking lot I meet someone who is here for the season from Chile or Argentina and have the opportunity to speak Spanish.

International Student Visas such as Vail’s program bring diversity to resort operations that can translate to a more welcoming experience for latinos.

While not all Hispanic households are Spanish dominant in the U.S.,  just imagine how it feels for someone who may be more comfortable speaking in Spanish, or even just seeing more people from similar backgrounds may make you feel.  Skiing is expensive and for most people not from a cold climate, is not necessarily something that you grew up doing.  This is where the industry can and needs to help.

Tourism boards from Arizona to Washington are actively pursuing multicultural communities to boost tourism.  Visit Denver has a site in multiple languages and actively markets to Hispanic and other communities.  Yet, there are few examples of ski resorts actively marketing to Hispanic, Asian, or African American communities.  At the very least increasing the diversity on the ski hill, will make others from those communities feel more welcome.

RRC Associates Study

So, for affluent communities with the means, the push is to introduce them to the mountains and the benefits of winter recreation.  Creating a great experience similar to that of all skiers and riders will pay great dividends.

More challenging for the industry (especially in the West) is how to involve the local communities, much of which are lower income Hispanic and in many cases undocumented.  Per a great article in Outside Magazine that discusses the issue as well as the work of the Doug  Coombs foundation who offer opportunities to more challenged, local, latino populations in Wyoming.  Many times these are the workers in the community, but reap few of the benefits of living in beautiful mountain communities, this organization helps to bring them onto the hill and further increase participation in the sport.

While this group, may not generate as much interest to resorts trying to sell luxury condos, the fact is that having people from diverse backgrounds enjoying the mountains creates a richer experience for all.

Additional Resources:

Will Multicultural Skiers Save the Ski Industry

NSAA report – Future Demographics

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Tourism Marketing


New Luxury Car

Reaching Hispanic Car Buyers

While the numbers may vary (one projection is that the Hispanic market will represent $1.7 Trillion buying power by 2020), the consensus is that the Hispanic market is massive, and therefore the influence of Hispanic car buyers is a major opportunity for any business.  In this case, let’s look at auto dealers.

Car dealership owners in the U.S. are focused on selling as many cars as possible and as their local or regional market changes they are one of the fastest groups to react to these changes.   While there are major advertising dollars focusing on Hispanic markets from some automakers, the local focus of the dealers means that regardless of the national focus, they may create their local sites, offers and advertising to grab the attention of their market.

Below is an example of from Arlington Toyota of a vehicle walk through in Spanish for their market.

Each market is different, even when looking at the Hispanic market.  The local market in Miami is quite different than the markets in San Francisco, New York or any other.  There are numerous factors including language (Spanish versus English), to cultural backgrounds and differences in country of origin or individuals or family (U.S. born, 3rd generation is different from 1st generation family recently arriving from Guatemala) can be significantly different.  In some markets, the big sellers may be the less expensive vehicles, while in many cases the Hispanic market is purchasing high end luxury cars. (Example from Lexus below) These are the details that local/regional dealerships understand.

Above is an example from JM Lexus showing the key attributes in Spanish of choosing a Lexus.

More than ever there are cost effective options for dealers.  From managing their own sites and social media presence, to working with local publications, to working with multicultural digital specialists to reach Hispanic car buyers. To continue to learn more about reaching these audiences, here are some additional resources:


latino food

IRI Examines New Product Purchasing Habits of U.S. Hispanic Shoppers

The Hispanic community is the fastest-growing ethnic group in the nation and spends more than $94.7 billion on CPG products annually. Because Hispanics are one of the most sought-after ethnic groups in the retail grocery market, IRI is diving deeper into last year’s most successful CPG launches to better understand Hispanics and New Product Pacesetters. CPG marketers have a great opportunity to capture more shopping dollars from Hispanic consumers, especially if they understand some key nuances in their attitudes and preferences regarding new products, compared to those of the general consumer population.

“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly”

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“By 2020, Hispanics will account for over half of the population growth in the United States, and their spending power will also increase significantly,” said Susan Viamari, vice president of Thought Leadership for IRI. “Unfortunately, most marketers don’t have easy access to detailed information on what Hispanic shoppers are buying, including in key CPG categories. This significantly limits new growth opportunities for brands, so we examined what Hispanics are buying, and even why they are buying products, to help marketers engage with these very important consumers.”

While Hispanic buying power is concentrated in select markets, including New Mexico, Texas, California, Florida, Nevada, Colorado, New Jersey, New York and Illinois, their interest in new products is spread across retail departments. Among those consumers who consider themselves avid new product adopters, there is a particular interest in the following departments (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Food:

26%, 29%, 25%, 23%

Beverage:

19%, 20%, 13%, 16%

Beauty/Personal Care:

19%, 24%, 29%, 12%

Home Care:

13%, 20%, 29%, 11%

Health Care:

10%, 13%, 20%, 9%

Pet Care:

9%, 8%, 9%, 6%

Top-Selling Food and Beverage Launches

Based on the most successful CPG launches in the 2017 New Product Pacesetters report, IRI uncovered the top-selling food and beverage products for Hispanic consumers:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Food and Beverage Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Halo Top® 93
2. Hillshire® Snacking 117
3. Chobani® Drinks 102
4. GOOD THiNS® 111
5. Oscar Mayer® Natural 116
6. Dunkin’ Donuts® Iced Coffee 72
7. Cracker Barrel® Macaroni & Cheese 143
8. Birds Eye® Steamfresh® Veggie Made 97
9. SMARTMADE by Smart Ones® 119
10. POWERADE® X ION4® 83

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage/Hispanic Specialty Panel

The mix of healthy and indulgent products found in the top-10 ranking truly reflects Hispanics’ attitudes toward eating. For instance, 36 percent of Hispanics say they eat healthy half of the time and eat whatever they want the other half. An additional 36 percent of Hispanic consumers say they eat healthy 80 percent of the time and allow for indulgences 20 percent of the time. So, moderation is the key for most Hispanics.

The top healthy eating considerations vary significantly across Hispanic sectors (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Avoiding processed foods:

58%, 54%, 31%, 56%

The right mix of different types of food:

44%, 36%, 36%, 42%

Natural foods:

30%, 41%, 24%, 23%

Organic foods:

20%, 19%, 40%, 15%

Include higher-calorie treats in moderation:

10%, 6%, 21%, 11%

Top-Selling Non-Food Launches

Forty percent of Pacesetter brands that hit the mark with Hispanics tout “more natural,” “organic,” “herbal,” or “holistic” attributes, which also helped shape the top-10 non-food ranking:

2017 New Product Pacesetters: Hispanic Top 10 Non-Food Brands
Dollars per Buyer Index: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers
(Average = 100)
1. Fancy Feast® Medleys® 149
2. Garnier® Whole Blends 104
3. Carol’s Daughter® 164
4. Herbal Essences® Bio:Renew 100
5. Copper Chef® 95
6. GLISS® Hair Repair® 96
7. Dove® Nutritive Solutions 116
8. Dentalife® 87
9. Red Copper® 105
10. OxiClean HD 140

Source: IRI Consumer and Shopper Insights Advantage™/Hispanic Specialty Panel

Hispanics are looking for new non-food products that provide new health benefits and faster results. Key considerations for new products include (English-speaking Hispanics, bilingual Hispanics, Spanish-speaking Hispanics and non-Hispanics):

Offers longer-lasting relief compared to existing alternatives:

31%, 28%, 32%, 32%

Offers faster relief than existing products:

30%, 25%, 14%, 30%

Treats multiple symptoms:

32%, 33%, 29%, 27%

Appeals to many people in my household:

27%, 28%, 25%, 21%

Offers new health benefits:

26%, 28%, 35%, 21%

“Hispanics are a highly diverse group, based on factors such as age, income, media preferences and language preference — English-preferred, bilingual or Spanish-preferred,” said Staci Covkin, principal of Consumer and Shopper Marketing for IRI. “Attracting Hispanics requires an understanding of these language preferences, along with their digital and social preferences, to quickly see a huge opportunity for CPG across food, beauty, home and health care brands. Aligning a new product launch with the needs of Hispanic shoppers is rapidly becoming a critical success factor for sustained CPG and retail growth, so improved insights and activation of these shoppers can result in significant sales and market share uplift.”

For the complete analysis on Hispanics and New Product Trends, click here. For more information, contact IRI at customerinteractioncenter@IRIworldwide.com

 

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180606005323/en/IRI-Examines-New-Product-Purchasing-Habits-U.S.


Banqos.com Announces Launch of Financial Platform for Latinos in the United States

Salt Lake City, Utah, May 1, 2018 – Banqos.com launched as an educational personal finance resource for the Latino community in the United States. The website exposes day-to-day banking issues, such as the complex world of credit cards, the comparison of banking services and credit unions, explained in Spanish in a simple way so that users understand the “fine print” of bank contracts.

Established in the growing technology region of Silicon Slopes, south of Salt Lake City, Utah, Banqos unveiled its financial web platform on May 1st of this year.

Banqos.com is an initiative of Juan Carlos Pinto, previously in private banking with the financial giant JP Morgan Chase in Silicon Valley, California. Mr. Pinto, with more than 10 years of experience in the financial industry, decided to break into the digital world by educating Latinos about U.S. banking institutions, with meticulously selected information in Spanish.

“Having many financial sources in English is great, but a large segment of the Hispanic community prefers information in Spanish. We are still behind in being financially informed compared to the rest of the population. With Banqos.com, we want to help close that gap, “explains Mr. Pinto.

The Banqos.com platform offers verified articles from financial institutions, government agencies and banking agents, in which they not only provide an objective perspective of the information but also include personal experiences of their collaborators and users to give them a more personal touch.

At this time, reliable resources to compare and choose banks, credit cards, prepaid cards, and credit unions are mostly available in English only. The Hispanic community is often ignored, which is unfortunate because the purchasing power of this sector is almost $ 2 billion.

Banqos, LLC | www.banqos.com | 385-200-1421 | info@banqos.com

Source: https://headlineplus.com/banqos-com-announces-launch-of-financial-platform-for-latinos-in-the-united-states/


Bank of America study shows continued confidence among Hispanics

Hispanic-owned small businesses remain one of the fastest-growing segments of the small business economy, creating jobs and growing revenue. Read on for highlights from the 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight, a survey of 394 small business owners (SBOs) across the country.

Confident about growth

Survey respondents expressed confidence about the economic environment, their business outlooks and opportunities for growth in 2018.

  • 60% expect their local economy to improve in the year ahead, and 67% think the same of the national economy.
  • 71% expect their revenue to increase in 2018, 37% plan to hire, and 26% intend to apply for a loan.
  • 77% plan to grow their business over the next five years.
  • 65% believe Hispanic SBOs face unique business challenges compared to non-Hispanics, although many feel their heritage has been an advantage.
  • 88% believe the Hispanic small business environment will strengthen in the next 10 years.

Hispanic SBOs lead stats in social media usage

The Spotlight also revealed that Hispanic SBOs rely more on digital tools and social media than the average small business owner.

  • 93% of Hispanic SBOs use digital tools in the day-to-day running of their business (vs 74% of SBOs on average), including 50% who use digital banking.
  • 76% rely on social media to help run their business (vs 41% of SBOs on average), primarily using it for the following:
    • Marketing (78%)
    • Networking (76%)
    • Sharing updates with customers (74%)
    • Hiring employees (57%)
  • 53% say social media has had a positive impact on their business’ bottom line (vs. 30% of SBOs on average).

Hispanic SBOs leverage digital tools, social media to fuel success. You should too.

Google research identifies Hispanics as being ahead of the curve when it comes to digital technology. They lead the general population in terms of adoption of new devices, are “power users” of mobile and over-index in video consumption.* The 2018 Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight uncovered ways in which forward-thinking Hispanic SBOs use technology to successfully run their businesses, reach new customers, and hire employees.

Read the complete 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight

Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight

GfK Public Affairs and Corporate Communications conducted the Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight survey between August 8 and September 28, 2017 using a pre-recruited online sample of Hispanic and non-Hispanic small business owners. GfK contacted a national sample of 1,013 small business owners in the United States with annual revenue between $100,000 and $4,999,999 and employing between 2 and 99 employees, as well as 394 interviews among Hispanic small business owners, 149 of whom were primary Spanish speakers. The final results were weighted to national benchmark standards for size, revenue and region, and, for the Hispanic augment, whether the respondents were primarily English-speaking or Spanish-speaking.

*Source: Your Next Big Opportunity: The U.S. Hispanic Market, Lisa Gevelber / Jul 2014 I Mobile, Video, Consumer Insights
https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/us-hispanic-market-digital/

 

Source: 2018 Bank of America Hispanic Business Owner Spotlight
https://smallbusinessonlinecommunity.bankofamerica.com/community/hispanic-owners-report

Source: http://sbbankers.bankofamerica.com/newsletter/March-2018#article-1


Latina Shoppers: The Transforming Agent Of The HBC World

As Female Hispanic age cohorts continue to grow and currently represent 18 % of the total 2016 U.S. female population, according to U.S. Census Bureau figures, so do their share of wallet and extraordinary influence on the Health and Beauty Care (HBC) market. Nielsen’s recently published report Latinas 2.0 details that in 2016, the total indexing averages among Latina consumers of HBC product lines surpasses the indexing of White Non- Hispanic shoppers in specific product lines including Cosmetics, Women’s Fragrances, Grooming Aids, Ethnic Beauty aids among others. However, beyond the quantitative data, what other criteria are driving HBC categories by the Latina shopper? Let’s look at five of these:

1. Lifestyle benchmarks supersede traditional acculturation variables: The marketing of HBC lines is increasingly becoming dependent on the correct granular recollection and interpretation of consumer insights based on lifestyles vs. the standard use of acculturation variables. My point here is that the traditional quad matrix of preferred language, media usage, cultural affinity to the country of origin and years residing in the U.S. begin to lose relevance as Latina consumers increasingly shape their HBC purchasing on everyday experiences and the influencing of peers or celebrity endorsements. This is not to say that the aforementioned acculturation variables are not useful, but they do lose relevancy as U.S. born consumers expand their dominance and influence in these extremely dynamic product segments.

2. Category demand is driving consistency in traditional media advertising expenditures:  Does it come as a surprise to see that over the past four years, three of the Top 10 brand advertisers in Spanish language media are HBC corporations? Based on the figures reported in the Ad Age’s 2017 Hispanic Fact Pack booklet, the combined investment of P&G, Genomma Lab International, and L’Oreal was valued at $799 million. This clearly correlates to the enormous appetite Latina shoppers have for these product lines. Keep in mind this only considers measured media, so it would be interesting to quantify other media expenditures which may not be measured.

3. In-store merchandising and personal selling are necessary to successfully connect with Latina HBC shoppers: Seeing is believing. For retailers and brands alike, it’s important to illuminate retail space with shades of yellow, orange, and red evoking optimism, warmth, cheerfulness, and audacity always liked by Latino shoppers. Also valid are the shades of green, blue and black which communicate serenity and elegance. This kaleidoscope of colors is of utmost importance for the contemporary Latina shopper who knows how to bridge different color patterns. HBC brands also depend on generating compelling product usage experiences among Latina shoppers if they expect to make significant brand loyalty inroads. This explains why bilingual beauty consultants are essential touchpoints that can make a difference in a retailer’s sales.

4. The advent of Latina-influenced HBC digital content: Behavioral segmentation is rapidly changing how brands communicate to Latina consumers. The recollection of values and lifestyle nuggets create a vast reservoir of creative ingredients that become the storylines that these women narrate every day. It also expands their size and influence in the digital arena, especially in mobile usage. To further support the assertion of content generation, the 2015 edition of the Siempre Mujer Hispanic Beauty research document found that more than 70% of all Latinas rank YouTube as their preferred source of information when assessing the purchase of beauty products. When everything is said and done, it exponentially escalates the use of creative materials incubated in a digital environment.

5. P.R. and influencer marketing, vital components in Latina HBC marketing: These communication disciplines are supremely strategic in the marketing process of HBC lines to Latina consumers. Their aspirational and trendsetting purchasing habits are embedded traits of the HBC purchasing process. A key benchmark highlighted in the Siempre Mujer Hispanic Beauty study reveals that more than 70% of all Latina HBC shoppers obtain information from Social Media channels leading to their eventual product purchases in these categories. Likewise, a full 55% of them gravitate to the bilingual context that bloggers provide in social media further magnifying the importance of the Latina Millennial shopper according to the same source.

The HBC categories represent some of the biggest opportunities to successfully franchise Latina shoppers, and given its relentless pace, it promises to be filled with excitement and challenges for those marketers and retailers targeting multicultural female consumers in the years to come.


10 Best Practices for Marketing to Hispanic Consumers

When you’re working with companies internationally, there’s an expectation that you will make an effort to understand the language and cultural differences among various countries and cultures. But within the U.S., linguistic and cultural differences are often overlooked—most notably, the fast-growing U.S. Spanish-speaking market. The U.S. is now the second largest Spanish-speaking country, behind Mexico.

View related webinar on multicultural customer experience: How to Market to Hispanic Consumers

2014 Pew Research Center report states that there are 55.4 million Spanish-speakers or Hispanics in the U.S., which is approximately 17.4% of the total U.S. population. And, Hispanic consumers represent $1.5 trillion in purchasing power. That’s a high market share to target, so it makes sense that an increasing number of companies are marketing to Hispanic consumers.

To capture this growing target audience, just translate your marketing content into Spanish, and you’re all set, right?

Not exactly.

Just like English in the U.S. vs. English in the U.K., not all Spanish is the same. With Spanish, from the many countries in Latin America to Spain, there are even more dialects. It’s not just about different pronunciations. Understand that many words have various meanings, depending on the dialect. This is true for many languages, including English, where elevatorin the U.S. is known as lift in the U.K.

Here are some best practices you should keep in mind and research further before you are developing a strategy for marketing to hispanics.

1. Understand the difference between Hispanic and Latino

There are many interpretations of how to define Hispanic vs Latino. For the purposes of this blog, I’ll distinguish the two in the following way: Hispanic refers to language and Latino (including Latina and Latino) refer to location Therefore, Hispanic here is defined as one who has a Spanish-speaking origin or ancestry, including Spain.

Latino refers to Spanish-speakers as well, but only people from Latin America—including Brazil. (Portuguese is spoken in Brazil, and thus, is not considered to be Hispanic.) Hispanic and Latino are often used interchangeably, even though they don’t mean the same thing. It’s important to be aware of not only who you are targeting, but also how you choose to reference them. Not all Spanish-speaking people are Latino, and not all Latinos are Hispanic.

2. Be aware of regional differences

According to the Pew Research Center, most U.S. Hispanics prefer to use their country of origin to describe themselves. More than half of the survey respondents said they have no preference for either term, Hispanic or Latino. However, it’s still important to localize your marketing efforts, as these preferences vary from state to state, and they also change as the Hispanic population grows.

For example, California has the highest Hispanic population percentage, and 30% of them say they prefer to be referenced as Hispanic, while 17% say they prefer Latino. But this preference is much stronger in Texas, where 46% of Hispanics said they prefer to be referenced as Hispanic, vs. 8% who prefer Latino.

Localization is critical in states with a high population of Hispanics, such as Texas, California, Arizona, New Mexico, New York, and Florida. There are several dialects of Spanish and Spanish variants in the U.S. Thus, Google Translate can’t compare to professional translation services—it lacks the ability to tailor translations to these dialects.

3. Consider generational and cultural gaps while tailoring marketing tactics and content

Hispanics, like many cultures, integrate their traditions from their countries of origin into their lives in the U.S. But cultural integration can vary depending on segments of the larger Hispanic consumer population. Generationally, they can be broken down into two main groups:

  • Traditionalists: Older immigrants, and some younger, are considered “traditionalists” who don’t speak fluent English. You can market to these traditionalists via Spanish-speaking TV and radio stations, as well as Spanish websites. Your marketing strategy should emphasize these traditional Hispanic cultural values and traditions including food, family, and holidays. Know the various dialects and idioms within a specific region, and don’t stop at the online home page, TV ad, or radio message. Keep the customer engaged.
  • Millennials: Second-generation Hispanics are those who are born in the U.S. into a Hispanic family. Like many second-generation ethnicities, they are typically the younger family members, including millennials, who have adopted many U.S. customs (and English) but still appreciate, respect, and enjoy their culture, language, and heritage.

10-best-practices-image

Note: White, Asian, and Black include only those who are single race and not Hispanic. Hispanics are of any race. Figures may not add to 100% due to rounding. Source: Pew Research Center analysis of 2014 American Community Survey (IPUMS), “The Nation’s Latino Population is Defined by its Youth.”

 

Culturally, marketers tend to divide Hispanic online consumers into three different categories: Hispanic Dominant, Bicultural, and U.S. Dominant.

  • Hispanic Dominant (23%): This group speaks predominantly Spanish at home and consumes most media in Spanish. Typically, they’re foreign born and have a mean age of 40. On average, they’ve lived in the U.S. for seven years.
  • Bicultural (31%): This crowd typically speaks both English and Spanish at home, but they consume most media in English. They’re a combination of foreign and U.S. born and have a mean age of 34. They’ve lived in the U.S., on average, for 22 years.
  • U.S. Dominant (46%): This bunch generally speaks English at home and consumes most media in English. They’re U.S. born and with a mean age of 37, they’ve lived in the U.S. an average of 36 years.

Offline, the sizing of these groups is reversed, with Hispanic Dominant representing 52% of the segment, Bicultural 19%, and U.S. Dominant 28%.

4. Consider using “Spanglish”

For a U.S. Dominant or Bicultural audience, blend both Spanish and English into your campaign, keeping English as the primary language but integrating Spanish phrases, quotes, terms, etc. to truly connect to Hispanic consumers.

5. Include Hispanic talents, using Spanish influenced music and imagery

Create campaigns that are centered on Hispanic imagery and tell vibrant, colorful stories. But avoid stereotypes or singling Hispanics out.

6. Create mobile-friendly campaigns

Pew Hispanic Center found that Hispanic mobile phone owners are more likely than Anglo mobile phone owners to access the internet—40% vs. 34%. And according to a July 2014 Google Consumer Survey, Hispanics are 1.5 times more likely to buy mobile apps and digital media than non-Hispanics. Don’t miss these opportunities to connect with Hispanic consumers. Be sure to optimize all your digital touch points and campaigns for mobile.

7. Include Hispanic culture in online ads

88% of digital-using Hispanics pay attention to online ads that include aspects of their culture—regardless of the ad’s language (Google Hispanic Marketing Forum, 2015).

8. Be consistent with Hispanic marketing

Offering a web page in Spanish is effective, but only if your landing page is in Spanish, too. The same is true for phone orders and support: Pressing “Numero 2” for Spanish on your phone keypad is helpful only if there is a Spanish-speaking representative on the other end. If you’re going to market to consumers in Spanish, be sure to support them throughout the customer journey.

9. Understand Spanish-speaking social media

This is where cultural patterns shift. According to CNN, the most active of all ethnic groups on social media sites are Hispanic adults, at 72%. CNN also points out that even though “Hispanic” is the identity most referenced on social media, the term “Latino” was mentioned more on Twitter. There are many reasons for this, one of which is that Latinos are becoming more prominent in TV shows, magazines, and professional sports.

For example, according to a 2016 Neilson report, 10% of overall NFL TV game viewers are Hispanic. This results in more Tweets on Latinos. The word “Latino” was also searched more on Google in the last few years. Cultural patterns vary by region (within the U.S.) and are also a result of more references to the types of activities, music, and other events that cater to the Latino population.

10. Be aware of cultural diversity

It all comes down to being aware of cultural diversity within any country, where multiple ethnicities and language dialects exist. And although no one is expected to know each dialect and market, there is much benefit and value to thoroughly researching and understanding the various linguistic and cultural differences, as well as the spending patterns within a particular country.

This can be done in many ways, such as hiring local employees or services that are aware of the various differences, as well as knowing the latest research on buying trends, social media trends, etc.

After all, if you are making the effort to market to Spanish speakers, be sure to be able to relate with them the way they relate to one another. Know their local culture, language, and customs. Bottom line: Localize, localize, localize.

To learn more, view the recorded webinar, How to Market to Hispanic Consumers.

About the author

sergio-restrepo-200x240Along with his operations responsibilities, as a digital marketing expert, Sergio provides sales support for Lionbridge Global Marketing Services. In 2007, he founded Darwin Zone, a Costa Rican-based digital marketing agency acquired by Lionbridge in 2014. There, he designed and implemented strategies for global brands including Nestle, 3M, New Balance, SABMiller, Honda, and Johnson & Johnson, among others.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: http://content.lionbridge.com/10-best-practices-for-marketing-to-hispanic-consumers/


New Research Shows How to Connect With U.S. Hispanics Online

Underserved and untapped. These were just two of the conclusions we came to last July when we wrote about the power and potential of U.S. Hispanic consumers. Almost a year later, the audience continues to garner significant attention—and rightly so.

U.S. Hispanics are one of three rising groups of super consumers, according to a recent Nielsen report (African-Americans and Asian-Americans being the other two). Why “super” consumers? The U.S. Hispanic population is fast-growing (the Census Bureau projects an increase of 86% between 2015 and 2050) and has tremendous economic clout (estimated to reach $1.5 trillion in buying power in 2015, a 50% increase from 2010). These are the kinds of numbers that should have every marketer sitting up and taking notice.

66% of U.S. Hispanics say they pay attention to online ads—almost 20 percentage points more than the general online population.

To better understand the online behavior of this digitally savvy group, we partnered with Ipsos MediaCT to study how language and culture influence brand consideration, trends in mobile habits, and variables that impact purchasing decisions. More than 4,500 self-identified U.S. Hispanics ages 18–64 (who access the internet via a digital device and have made a purchase in the past six months*) were recruited either online or in person to complete an online survey. The study explored their online behavior and preferences about online sources, digital ads, and search. This new research uncovered some compelling new insights and best practices for engaging this audience.

Insight #1: U.S. Hispanic consumers are online and on mobile

U.S. Hispanic consumers are going online, and they’re increasingly turning to search. More than three-quarters of those surveyed (79%) said they’re using search engines on a daily basis. It’s their #1 online source for gathering information about a purchase, and they rely on it heavily during their research. (Of those who use search in any phase, 73% use it during research.)

Given the high rate of ownership and use of smartphones among Hispanic consumers, it’s no surprise that 68% of the respondents who search at least monthly do so on their mobile devices to find the information they need. More than half of U.S. Hispanic consumers who use online sources are using their smartphones specifically to gather information before making a purchase. And 83% of those who access the internet on a mobile device use it while in a store to inform a purchase in real time. This is an opportunity for marketers to connect with these consumers and provide them with the information they need to make a purchase—online or in-store.

Source: Google/Ipsos MediaCT, Digital Hispanics: The Role of Culture and Language Online study, April 2015.

What marketers need to know: Search is the top online resource used by U.S. Hispanics for gathering information about a purchase, and many of these searches are done on mobile. Make sure you’re connecting with members of this tech-savvy audience on the devices they’re using most.

Insight #2: Online sources and ads influence U.S. Hispanic consumer behavior

U.S. Hispanics use online sources at a higher rate than the general online population (54% vs. 46%) throughout the many micro-moments in the purchase journey, from inspiration to purchase. When it comes to gathering information about something they’re considering buying, these consumers favor online sources over family, radio, and TV. Online sources actually ranked 20 percentage points higher than TV (54% vs. 34%).

Source: Google/Ipsos MediaCT, Digital Hispanics: The Role of Culture and Language Online study, April 2015.

When it comes to online ads, 66% of U.S. Hispanics online say they pay attention to them—almost 20 percentage points more than the general online population. This data point alone can justify focusing more advertising attention and online efforts on this growing audience.

This influence of online ads, in terms of their level of effectiveness, is true across platforms: video, display, and search. Among those who recall seeing online ads, 93% of them take action—whether that’s performing a search, visiting a company’s website, or making a purchase.

What marketers need to know: U.S. Hispanics turn to online sources to inform their purchases more than the general online population. They also pay more attention to ads and take action. With such high engagement, they’re well-positioned to become a key target group for many industries. Don’t miss the opportunity: Be present with relevant content and ads across platforms and devices.

Insight #3: Cultural relevance drives engagement and influence

So how do brands engage U.S. Hispanics in a meaningful way? In a word, culture. Seventy percent of survey respondents said it’s important for a website’s content to be culturally relevant when they’re gathering information about a purchase. This applies to ads, too. When an ad includes aspects of Hispanic culture, regardless of language, 88% pay attention, and 41% feel more favorable about a brand that aims to be culturally relevant.

Among those who recall seeing online ads, 93% of them take action—whether that’s performing a search, visiting a company’s website, or making a purchase.

Marketers have asked us for years about the elements of marketing initiatives that U.S. Hispanics find most appealing. Here are the top five things brands can do to make their content culturally relevant, according to our survey respondents.

1. Relevant topics and product features: Incorporate things online that U.S. Hispanics care about or are unique to the Hispanic experience. Speak to their cultural sensibilities. Food, traditions, holidays, and family ranked the highest in terms of appeal.

2. Visuals: Creative should reflect the Hispanic culture in a tasteful and identifiable way. Users want to see themselves reflected in creative that includes the things they care about.

3. Language: While not as important as culture, language does matter. For some U.S. Hispanic consumers, Spanish and bilingual content online are still signals that you want to engage with them.

4. Entertainment: U.S. Hispanics value entertainment online that appeals to them culturally, so consider including relevant music and video content.

5. Influencers/Testimonials: Whether it’s a celebrity, a YouTube creator, or another influencer online, U.S. Hispanics want to hear from people like them.

What marketers need to know: Cultural signals—food, family, and traditions—resonate with U.S. Hispanics online regardless of language. Including culturally relevant elements in your brand’s website and ads can make them more appealing and help drive engagement and action.

Insight #4: U.S. Hispanic consumers are highly bilingual online

The idea that Spanish should always be used to engage U.S. Hispanics online is an outdated notion. When it comes to language online, this audience is truly bilingual. To explore the use of each language, we looked at search trends and how our respondents use language at home and online. We found that Spanish language searches are on the rise. The number of Spanish keyword searches has increased from about 65% to 200% across key categories, such as auto, food, beauty, and others, between 2011 and 2014.1 Yet our survey found that Spanish-dominant speakers often use English online. While 28% of our respondents are Spanish-dominant at home, only 16% said they use Spanish most or all of the time when online. At the same time, 31% identified as English-dominant at home, and more than half (52%) said they use English most or all of the time when online (see chart). Beyond that, 94% of respondents said they felt comfortable consuming English content online for at least one common online activity (sharing, shopping, or researching).

Despite the high number of search queries in Spanish, members of this audience are comfortable consuming content in English. If they land on an English website, for example, only one in five will look for a Spanish site instead. What’s most important to them is getting the relevant information they need in the moments they need it.

What marketers need to know: Marketers can reach U.S. Hispanics online during the entire web experience, especially during the research phase of their purchase journey, by leveraging both English and Spanish terms. Given the audience’s bilingual nature, consider developing ad campaigns in English and Spanish, even if they direct to an English landing page.

Methodology

Google partnered with Ipsos MediaCT to explore U.S. Hispanics’ behavior with regard to online sources, online ads, and search. They also looked at how language and culturally relevant elements impact online behavior. In December 2014, 4,533 self-identified U.S. Hispanics ages 18–64 completed an online survey. Of these respondents, 3,905 were recruited online and 628 respondents were recruited via face-to-face intercept. All respondents were screened to ensure they were the primary decision maker or shared responsibility for a purchase in the past six months (in Travel, Auto, Retail, Tech, Finance, Restaurant, Entertainment, CPG, or Health) and that they regularly used either a smartphone, computer, or tablet to access the internet.

* These individuals are decision makers in relevant sales categories.

 

Sources
1 Google Data, Auto, Telecommunications, Entertainment, Food, Pharmaceutical, Beauty, January 2011–December 2014.

https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/articles/new-research-shows-how-to-connect-with-digital-hispanics-online.html