Political Outreach to Hispanic Voters - HELP

Really!! Google Translate – Presidential candidates showing ineptitude in reaching out to Hispanic voters.

Reaching Hispanics in language can have numerous pitfalls that even pose a challenge for native Spanish speakers, but the errors being made by political candidates for the top job in the U.S. is an impressive show of laziness.

Politico reviewed numerous Spanish language pages of some presidential candidates and found many to be lacking.  Following is an excerpt from the Politico article: which has some excellent examples of missteps.

While Google Translate can serve as a workable starting point, more often than not it needs a human hand to produce Spanish that would pass muster with a native speaker.

As with any outreach to the Hispanic or any other multicultural audience, if you plan on reaching out in language, it is extremely important to get it right.  If you can’t, then stick to English.

According to Pew Research: Mapping the Latino electorate there were more than 29 million latinos that were eligible to vote in the 2018 midterm elections.  In states such as California (30%), New Mexico (42%), Texas (30%) among others where the percentage of eligible voters being Hispanic, reaching this audience the right way is important.

While acknowledging that Hispanic voters are important is the easy part, the effort by both the Republican National Committee (GOP) as well as the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is lacking.  If the major committees are unable or unwilling to put forth the effort, what can you expect from political candidates.  Some examples of the Latino/Hispanic pages from the major political parties show a severe lack of effort to reach out to this part of the latino electorate.

 

For anyone who has written in a second language, mistakes will happen, and to some extent when you see candidates make the attempt to speak in another language, some mistakes are understandable, but if your campaign or brand is serious about reaching out to bilingual and Spanish dominant Hispanics, there are inexpensive and simple ways to do it.  There are numerous certified translators, qualified multicultural agencies, and most likely a native speaker nearby that can assist.

The Politico article evaluated numerous sites for Democratic presidential candidates and is worth reviewing.  Here is just one example to see where some candidates are missing out.

Additional Resources:

Pew Hispanic: Mapping the Latino electorate

Reach Multicultural: Multicultural Voter Resources

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Political Advertising

Republican National Committee: GOP Hispanic page

Democratic National Committee: Latinos

 


Latino participation in winter sports

Why the ski industry needs more Hispanics skiers and riders.

In looking at the importance of key multicultural populations on winter sports and the impact they have on the ski industry, one group stands out as being poised to deliver.  While the ski industry does need to do more to draw Hispanic families to the resorts, there are already some key factors that make that easier than with other multicultural groups.

In looking at the African American market one thing that gets mentioned in articles is that there are not many African American skiers on the hill, and that lack of diversity presents challenges in making this segment feel welcome.  In contrast, at least in the West, not only is there a notable increase in Hispanic families living and visiting the mountains, but there is also an added benefit of workers from Latin America.

In California & Colorado (and many others), when you go to the resort, many of the workers are seasonal and visiting from other countries.  Every season on a chairlift or even in the parking lot I meet someone who is here for the season from Chile or Argentina and have the opportunity to speak Spanish.

International Student Visas such as Vail’s program bring diversity to resort operations that can translate to a more welcoming experience for latinos.

While not all Hispanic households are Spanish dominant in the U.S.,  just imagine how it feels for someone who may be more comfortable speaking in Spanish, or even just seeing more people from similar backgrounds may make you feel.  Skiing is expensive and for most people not from a cold climate, is not necessarily something that you grew up doing.  This is where the industry can and needs to help.

Tourism boards from Arizona to Washington are actively pursuing multicultural communities to boost tourism.  Visit Denver has a site in multiple languages and actively markets to Hispanic and other communities.  Yet, there are few examples of ski resorts actively marketing to Hispanic, Asian, or African American communities.  At the very least increasing the diversity on the ski hill, will make others from those communities feel more welcome.

RRC Associates Study

So, for affluent communities with the means, the push is to introduce them to the mountains and the benefits of winter recreation.  Creating a great experience similar to that of all skiers and riders will pay great dividends.

More challenging for the industry (especially in the West) is how to involve the local communities, much of which are lower income Hispanic and in many cases undocumented.  Per a great article in Outside Magazine that discusses the issue as well as the work of the Doug  Coombs foundation who offer opportunities to more challenged, local, latino populations in Wyoming.  Many times these are the workers in the community, but reap few of the benefits of living in beautiful mountain communities, this organization helps to bring them onto the hill and further increase participation in the sport.

While this group, may not generate as much interest to resorts trying to sell luxury condos, the fact is that having people from diverse backgrounds enjoying the mountains creates a richer experience for all.

Additional Resources:

Will Multicultural Skiers Save the Ski Industry

NSAA report – Future Demographics

Alcance Media Group – Multicultural Tourism Marketing


canary in the coal mine Venezuala is in trouble

Asylum applications - canary in the coal mine

With pending elections throughout many countries in Latin America, the spotlight is on the numerous challenges facing the region, and specifically the Venezuela elections.  From organizations fighting “fake news” in Mexico elections to those that are a foregone conclusion such as Venezuela.  Elections have a ripple effect throughout all of the americas and one look no further than asylum applications and immigration numbers to see which countries are in the most trouble.  In a CNN article regarding Venezuelans fleeing the situation in Venezuela a couple of pictures tell the story.

Asylum applications 2017 comparing Venezuela, China and Mexico

Asylum Applications from Venezualans to US 2015-16

The key reason that individuals or families uproot and move to another country where there is still uncertainty is because they are almost certain that the current situation will not improve in the near term.  Whether civil war such as that of Colombia, to gangs such as Central America, to economic mismanagement a la Venezuela immigrants and asylum seekers are merely looking to improve their situation.

I was traveling in Venezuela shortly after the election of Hugo Chavez.  During my travels I met an executive from a global CPG company and very quickly it was evident that they saw the writing on the wall and were going to start moving many key assets out of the country.  Sure enough, the government started to implement policies that made it almost impossible for companies to do business in the country (most recently the government took over Kellogg’s facilities).  For a summary of the current situation in Venezuela this segment from Last Week Tonight with John Oliver has brief rundown prior to the Venezuela elections.

 

For the first time Venezuelan asylum seekers to the United States have outnumbered that of Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador.  Just like a major influx in Colombian asylum seekers in the past (which has since calmed as the country has stabilized and prospered), one key statistic to signal where in the world major problems are brewing is asylum applications.

While the current government in Venezuela is sure to win the “election” on Sunday May 20, 2018, the more important questions is whether the people of the country will survive another six year term or if something changes.

 


Hispanic marketing - still relevant?

Is Hispanic marketing still relevant?  In all but the most remote places, latino influence in the United States is hard to miss, so of course it is.

Multicultural audiences continue to grow in size and importance and the Hispanic audience is one of the most important.  The U.S. Hispanic market has massive influence on the success businesses as well as on American culture.  Almost, if not all major cities in the U.S. have integrated latino food, music, culture, and even street signs into their metro area.    What is always being debated is how to reach this segment.  From a recent media post article there were some key points that highlighted some interesting items.

Language:  While to percentage of Hispanics that are proficient in English has risen swiftly, the percentage of Hispanics that stream entertainment in Spanish has also increased significantly (even greater among Hispanic millennials).  

Boy with Sombrero lazy Hispanic marketing.
Some hispanic marketing attempts are less than ideal.

Influence:  While the population growth is still strong, it has slowed somewhat, yet the integration of the segment into American culture is stronger than ever.  In business ownership the Hispanic community now comprises ownership of 12% of all U.S. business.

Many marketers take the approach of adding a stock photo of a latino looking person to an ad, check a box on whatever programmatic platform and call it a day.  While there are some that fully integrate a “total market” strategy” incorporating cultural relevance, language, etc with an overall cohesive strategy,  but that seems to fall more to Toyota, P&G, Coca Cola and other major advertisers.  

The U.S. Hispanic segment is one of the most important segments and represents major buying power and influence.  It is time for marketers to pay more than lip service to the importance of the group.  There are numerous factors in these decisions such as time, budget, and need.  However there are numerous options to reach this segment through focused media, and utilizing agencies that specialize in multicultural segments that are more effective and don’t necessarily require utilizing an entire advertising budget.

 

 

 


Mexico Elections: Facing challenges in 2018

In a year with multiple presidential elections happening through Latin America, the region and specifically the Mexico elections on July 1, 2018 face challenges. Just like the United States and the much publicized “fake news” phenomena, the issue is a global one and all countries are battling against disruptions in their systems whether from foreign governments, bots, or extremist rhetoric the battle is only beginning.

Slide from Latin America presentation by Le Black Room at Campaign Tech East 2018
Slide from Latin America presentation by Le Black Room at Campaign Tech East 2018

Returning from a political conference in Washington D.C. where “fake news” was a frequent discussion point, I came across America’s Quarterly (free at the American Airlines lounge) and there was an interesting breakdown of the key players in the Mexico election.  Corruption, crime and of course the economy will make the battle on July 1, 2018 an interesting one.  And while the debate may rage on which direction the country should go, and each person has their opinion on which candidate would be the best, the even bigger challenge is to make sure that there is accurate information for the voters to make an informed decisions during the Mexico elections of 2018.

Political advertising itself runs a broad spectrum and each campaign will defend itself as well as work to shine a negative light on the shortcomings of the other candidates.  Now with the proliferation of fake accounts, bots, unscrupulous campaigns now even have more resources to proliferate false information so the challenge is even harder for finding accurate information.  So, what is  or can be done?

  • Don’t just trust a headline or social media post.  The issues with social media are well documented
  • Traditional news sources (broadcast, print, and digital) have a code of journalistic ethics and years of experience.
  • Government voter pamphlets are a starting point for research on initiatives & candidates.
  • Fact checking organizations (again, worth reviewing process and who is supporting).  In the United States there are numerous, however in Latin America there are still some beyond the traditional media such as Verificado2018 / Verificado.MX (Mexico).

For the Mexico elections #Verificado2018 is supported by over 60 publications (from La Economista, Forbes, El Universal, Milenio, Televisa and more) and is non partisan.  While there is nothing that can replace reading and thinking about the information and sources, having these resources may help should you have questions about the information that you are seeing.

 

 


Is The U.S. Hispanic Market A Growth Market?

U.S. Hispanic Market

The Hispanic market has traditionally been defined by most marketers as the growing population of foreign-born immigrants in the U.S. who have emigrated from Spanish-speaking Latin American countries (mainly Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean).

While the market definition has generally expanded during the last 10-15 years to include native-born second- and third-generation Hispanics, the “core” Hispanic market has been characterized by the unacculturated and partially acculturated Latin American immigrants who have represented separate and distinct market opportunities for companies to reach and sell to. The defining characteristic of this market has been the growth and use of Spanish language media and advertising, predominantly consumed by this “core” Spanish-speaking immigrant consumer.

Over the last 30 years, the Hispanic market has exploded, growing from 14.8 million in 1980 to 55 million in 2014, according to Pew Research, but 55% of that growth was driven by immigration in the 1980s and ’90s that exceeded U.S. births. However, around 2004, immigration into the U.S. by Hispanics started a steady decline. In 2016, only 28% of the roughly 1 million annual immigrants into the U.S. were Hispanic. Starting in 2010, Asian immigration started to outpace Hispanic immigration.

COMMENTARY

Is The U.S. Hispanic Market A Growth Market?

The Hispanic market has traditionally been defined by most marketers as the growing population of foreign-born immigrants in the U.S. who have emigrated from Spanish-speaking Latin American countries (mainly Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean).

While the market definition has generally expanded during the last 10-15 years to include native-born second- and third-generation Hispanics, the “core” Hispanic market has been characterized by the unacculturated and partially acculturated Latin American immigrants who have represented separate and distinct market opportunities for companies to reach and sell to. The defining characteristic of this market has been the growth and use of Spanish language media and advertising, predominantly consumed by this “core” Spanish-speaking immigrant consumer.

Over the last 30 years, the Hispanic market has exploded, growing from 14.8 million in 1980 to 55 million in 2014, according to Pew Research, but 55% of that growth was driven by immigration in the 1980s and ’90s that exceeded U.S. births. However, around 2004, immigration into the U.S. by Hispanics started a steady decline. In 2016, only 28% of the roughly 1 million annual immigrants into the U.S. were Hispanic. Starting in 2010, Asian immigration started to outpace Hispanic immigration.

Source: Pew Hispanic

Looking ahead, the percentage of Hispanic immigration is forecast to decrease steadily to 26% and potentially drop down below 25% by 2020, Pew found. This could trend even farther downward considering the current political environment in the United States.

So, while new Hispanic immigration into the U.S. is still forecast to top 250,000 per year, another trend, reverse immigration, primarily among Mexicans returning from the U.S., is forecast to continue at levels of approximately 200,000 per year. The result is that net Hispanic immigration into the U.S. will be anemic at best, with growth rates of less than 0.4% per year or less than 80,000 per year. This is not a growth market.

While geopolitical and economic factors may change this trend, the next five years look bleak for “core” Hispanic market population growth in sharp contrast to the go-go ’80s and ’90s when the market grew rapidly.

Overall, the U.S. Hispanic population is forecast to grow, but that growth will come primarily from U.S. births. Which leads to a critical question: Is this U.S.-born Hispanic market a separate and distinct market from the foreign-born immigrant Hispanic market? This question goes to the heart of the future of Hispanic marketing. I would argue that this U.S.-born, acculturated Hispanic is separate and distinct and the strategies and tactics that worked for marketing to immigrant Hispanics the last 30 years will not work for native Hispanics.

The numbers paint a very clear picture: there are two Hispanic markets — one that is stagnant and aging and one that is growing and getting younger. As I’ve argued numerous times over the years, the old way of Hispanic marketing is becoming irrelevant. A new way forward is required to address this new vibrant market. A new Hispanic market requires a new approach to Hispanic marketing.


Workplace challenges for multicultural women

Throughout the world and especially in the United States there are times of the year that focus on the celebration of diversity.  The month of March is Women’s History month and not only focuses attention on the achievements, but also brings to the forefront current issues regarding gender inequalities in the workplace and beyond.

One of the more interesting areas related to gender involve the influence of multicultural women and workplace diversity.  Globally, the acceptance and influence of women in the workplace is for the most part increasing.  In the U.S. the impact of women from multicultural segments (Latina, Asian, African American and others) is steadily increasing.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the increasing percentage of multicultural women in the workplace between 2014-2024 will continually increase: Black women (+11.3%) , Asian women (+24.3%), and Hispanic women (+30.3%) while that of White women will stay similar (-2.1%).

Multicultural women gaining in the workplace

While the increase in diversity and opportunities expand there are of course well known issues such as wages and underrepresentation in leadership roles that are challenges for all women, this is even more pronounced with the multicultural segments.  For example: according to the National Women’s Law Center there is an even larger wage gap for women of color.   And as far as leadership positions are concerned women of color remain severely underrepresented as do women in general.  In the case of the low-wage workforce these groups are somewhat overrepresented making up almost half which also shows additional challenges.

Of course there are no short term solutions to the inequalities and challenges that exist, there is a benefit to paying attention to the contributions as well as the challenges that exist in the workplace and beyond.  Here are some other sources for additional information about Women’s History month as well as our Diversity calendar for 2018 to learn more about times where there will be additional focus (and advertising) centered around diverse groups.

 


USA multicultural delegation for the Olympics in PyeongChang

The 2018 Olympic games in PyeongChang South Korea are an exhibition of diversity in sport.  Every four years the United States has an opportunity to show the world just how diverse we are.  While the likes of Chloe Kim (U.S. born Korean American gold medalist snowboarder) are making headlines, the 2018 U.S. Olympic team is one of the largest and most diverse ever.

Quick statistics on U.S. Olympic team diversity for the 2018 Olympic games in PyeongChang South Korea.

  • 242 athletes
  • 108 female (45%)
  • 10 African-Americans
  • 11 Asian-Americans
  • 3 Latinos (plus 1 for Puerto Rico and even a Mexico athlete who grew up in the U.S.)
  • 2 openly gay athletes
  • age range 17-39

In a challenging global environment where seemingly diversity is not always welcomed, this is an area where the United States does lead and hopefully will continue.  Regardless of the medal count the stories of the Olympic games and the challenges of the athletes are always a great story.

 

 


Congreso Portada LATAM 2017

PortadaLat 2017 Conference | Miami | June 7-8, 2017

Portada has been the leading source of expert analysis on the US multicultural and Latin American marketing and innovation spaces since 2003. For the 9th annual edition of PortadaLat our team is gathering a unique set of key decision  makers and thought leaders in one place to share insights, brainstorm solutions and debate the future of marketing technology, digital platforms, brand marketing and more.

More information: https://www.portada-online.com/events/portadalat/